Jeet Kune Do Videos

Richard Bustillo and Ted Wong: Two JKD Legends Featured in Bruce Lee’s Fighting Method DVD

Bruce Lee's Fighting Method: Basic Training and Self-Defense Techniques, a DVD published by Black Belt magazine featuring Ted Wong and Richard Bustillo.In this exciting preview of the DVD Bruce Lee’s Fighting Method: Basic Training and Self-Defense Techniques, JKD legend Richard Bustillo is shown kicking a** and takin’ names as he executes jeet kune do techniques.


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The director and co-founder of the International Martial Arts and Boxing Academy in Carson, California, JKD master Richard Bustillo has more than 30 years of experience in the martial arts.

JEET KUNE DO TECHNIQUES VIDEO
Richard Bustillo Shows You How It’s Done in DVD Preview for Bruce Lee’s Fighting Method: Basic Training and Self-Defense Techniques


Richard Bustillo began studying JKD under Bruce Lee in Los Angeles’ Chinatown area at age 24. Because his time with the late master continuously drove home the limits of following a single established style, Richard Bustillo always strove to expand his horizons.

“From Bruce’s beliefs regarding established styles, I learned to train with an open mind,” Richard Bustillo says.


Get your copy of this FREE Guide — Bruce Lee Quotes: 10 Jeet Kune Do Masters Examine Bruce Lee’s Philosophy — to understand how the Bruce Lee philosophy of examining other arts served to enhance the martial arts of Richard Bustillo, Taky Kimura, Ted Wong and others!


Ted Wong: The Master’s Protégé

Also featured in Bruce Lee’s Fighting Method: Basic Training and Self-Defense Techniques is the late Ted Wong.

Considered to be Bruce Lee’s last major private student and protégé, Ted Wong trained with the master toward the later stages of jeet kune do’s development. Ted Wong appeared with Bruce Lee in the jeet kune do techniques photos for the Bruce Lee’s Fighting Method books (both the original individual volumes and Bruce Lee’s Fighting Method: The Complete Edition.)

Ted Wong is one of only four students to receive direct certification from Bruce Lee. After Bruce Lee’s death, Ted Wong chose not to teach jeet kune do publicly; instead, he established a semiprivate, nonprofit school in San Francisco in 1990. Sadly, he passed away on November 24, 2010.

Bruce Lee: The Master

Considered by many fans to be a martial arts and motion pictures legend, Bruce Lee first studied wing chun kung fu in Hong Kong under the tutelage of Yip Man. Upon arriving in the United States, Bruce Lee developed what he labeled jeet kune do: a concept of martial arts for the individual man, literally translated as “the way of the intercepting fist.”

His first book, Tao of Jeet Kune Do, became a standard in the martial arts field. It was followed by Bruce Lee’s Fighting Method, a series of four volumes compiled by Bruce Lee’s friend and student M. Uyehara — and later the hard-bound deluxe book Bruce Lee’s Fighting Method: The Complete Edition.

The jeet kune do techniques DVD from which the above preview is taken covers the first two individual books (Volume 1 and Volume 2) of Bruce Lee’s Fighting Method.

Topics on the Bruce Lee’s Fighting Method: Basic Training and Self-Defense Techniques DVD include warm-ups, basic exercises, on-guard positions, footwork, power training, speed development and self-defense techniques.

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Bruce Lee’s Fighting Method: Basic Training and Self-Defense Techniques

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Tao of Jeet Kune Do: Expanded Edition

Second-Generation Bruce Lee Student Lamar M. Davis II Shows You How to Use JKD Trapping as an Attack!

Jeet kune do moves expert Lamar Davis II, second-generation student of Bruce Lee.Bruce Lee’s jeet kune do comprises many principles, one of which is economy of motion through efficiency, directness and simplicity.

Second-generation Bruce Lee student Lamar M. Davis II, who studied under five of Bruce Lee’s original students (Joseph Cowles, Patrick Strong, Leo Fong, Jerry Poteet and Steve Golden), brings this concept to life in this jeet kune do technique video excerpted from his three-DVD series Jeet Kune Do for the Advanced Practitioner.
 

JEET KUNE DO VIDEO
Lamar M. Davis II Shows You How to Use Jeet Kune Do Trapping as an Attack!


As Lamar Davis explains in this video excerpt from his DVD series Jeet Kune Do for the Advanced Practitioner, this approach to martial arts fighting is about attacking the hand(s) for the primary purpose of immobilization. “When we use trapping, it is as a result of the opponent’s defensive action, but it doesn’t always have to be that way,” Lamar Davis says. “I can preplan an attack based on my opponent’s position and based on the way I initiate my movement to draw him into position where I can attack with a trap.”


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“Some jeet kune do practitioners prefer not to do this,” Lamar Davis continues. “Others don’t even know that this exists, as they always think of trapping as strictly a byproduct of hitting. But yes, trapping can be specifically a way of attacking the opponent.”

Lamar Davis demonstrates the trapping-as-an-attack technique with his training partner and longtime student Ken Jones, explaining, “One of the things that I might be tempted to do is what we call a double jom sao entry. … I cut into both of his arms with a double jom sao movement, forcing his arms in and then I trap and hit him [in the face].”


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The jeet kune do technique of trapping for attack is an organic, efficient, fast and effective movement that immobilizes the attacker’s arms and hands, opening a direct line for Lamar Davis to launch a strike to the chin. Lamar Davis breaks down the execution: “[A] quick jut sao, pulling [the opponent’s] arm down; lan sao to shut both arms down, and then hit.”

For more information on this topic and others, such as …

  • attacks
  • defenses
  • energy training
  • timing
  • mobility

… be sure to pick up a copy of Lamar M. Davis II’s three-volume jeet kune do DVD series Jeet Kune Do for the Advanced Practitioner, available now in our online store!

Related Martial Arts Books, E-Books,
DVDs and Video Downloads

Jeet Kune Do for the Advanced Practitioner — Volume 3: Trapping Hands

The Complete
Chinatown Jeet Kune Do: Essential Elements of Bruce Lee’s Martial Art

The Ultimate Guide to Jeet Kune Do

Bruce Lee’s One-Inch Punch Demonstrated During Martial Arts Photo Shoot by Jeet Kune Do Expert Lamar M. Davis II

Second-generation Bruce Lee student Lamar M. Davis II studied under five of Bruce Lee’s original students (Joseph Cowles, Patrick Strong, Leo Fong, Jerry Poteet and Steve Golden). Through this jeet kune do technique video demonstrating Lee’s one-inch punch, Lamar M. Davis II brings the concept of economy of motion through efficiency, directness and simplicity to life.

JEET KUNE DO TECHNIQUE VIDEO
Lamar M. Davis II Demonstrates Bruce Lee’s One-Inch Punch!


The stuff of legend in films such as Kill Bill: Vol. 2, Jet Li’s Fearless and the feature-film re-imagining of The Green Hornet, the one-inch punch is actually a punching exercise that translates into a close-quarters strike of significant explosive power. Made popular by Bruce Lee, of course, at demonstrations such as the 1964 Long Beach International Karate Championships, the one-inch punch also has been notably used by martial artists such as Michael D. Echanis.

“You hear some people refer to the one-inch punch as this, but this is actually a three-inch punch,” Lamar M. Davis II explains, gesturing with an open palm and fingers pointing toward his opponent’s central chest. “The one-inch punch actually comes from the first knuckle.”

Positioning himself in front of his demonstration partner’s chest-held focus mitt, Lamar M. Davis II continues: “I just explode from here into the glove. And there’s not going to be any pulling back.”

The demonstration speaks for itself, as the impact of Lamar M. Davis II’s one-inch punch knocks his partner significantly off-balance, sending him backward several steps — all without a windup preceding the explosive strike.


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A martial arts practitioner for more than 40 years, Lamar M. Davis II has devoted more than 30 of those years exclusively to training inBruce Lee’s art of jeet kune do. Davis is certified as a full/senior instructor by five of Bruce Lee’s original students.

Jeet kune do expert Lamar M. Davis II is the founder and head instructor of Hardcore Jeet Kune Do. He serves as the executive director/senior instructor of the Hardcore Jeet Kune Do Chinese Gung Fu Association. Lamar M. Davis II is also the co-founder of the International Wing Chun/Jeet Kune Do Alliance and the Efficient Warrior Alliance.

For more topics from Bruce Lee’s jeet kune do, such as …

  • attacks
  • defenses
  • energy training
  • timing
  • mobility

… be sure to pick up a copy of Lamar M. Davis II’s three-volume jeet kune do DVD set, Jeet Kune Do for the Advanced Practitioner, available in our online store!…

Boxing Techniques That Bruce Lee Adapted Into Jeet Kune Do Techniques for Avoiding Attacks

Lamar Davis is a jeet kune do techniques expert and author of the DVD series Jeet Kune Do for the Advanced Practitioner.

Lamar Davis — the founder of and head instructor at Hardcore Jeet Kune Do as well as the executive director/senior instructor for the Hardcore Jeet Kune Do Chinese Gung Fu Association and the co-founder of the International Wing Chun/Jeet Kune Do Alliance and the Efficient Warrior Alliance — has studied and trained in Bruce Lee’s art of jeet kune do for more than 30 years. He has been certified as a full/senior instructor by several of Bruce Lee’s original students.

In this exclusive jeet kune do video, pulled from his DVD collection Jeet Kune Do for the Advanced Practitioner, the second-generation Bruce Lee student explains and demonstrates evasive tactics in JKD moves that Bruce Lee based on boxing techniques.


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JEET KUNE DO TECHNIQUES VIDEO
Lamar Davis Demonstrates Jeet Kune Do Techniques That Bruce Lee Developed From Boxing Techniques


Jeet Kune Do Techniques Based on Boxing Techniques

“Most of these movements Bruce Lee took from boxing,” Lamar Davis explains in this exclusive video.

If the opponent fires lead-hand punches toward his head, Lamar Davis explains, you have the option of executing one of the basic boxing techniques adapted for JKD moves known as a “slip” (or “outside slip”). The move is simple: Move to the outside of the hand’s forward trajectory — or slip to the side, out of its path.


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Bruce Lee Training Research: How Boxing Influenced His Jeet Kune Do Techniques


In boxing techniques, there is such a thing as an “inside slip,” but the jeet kune do expert warns against it. “I prefer to slip to the outside of the arm simply because you’re a little bit safer if you slip to the outside,” Lamar Davis explains.

If a punch is coming straight at your face, you have the option of snapping straight back. Among boxing techniques adapted for JKD moves, this selection is called a “backward snap” or a “snap back.”

Boxing Techniques Used by Jeet Kune Do Techniques Practitioners for Avoiding the Hook

“[An opponent might] fire a hook at my head,” Lamar Davis says, “in which case, I duck. When I duck, I bend my knees, I drop straight down, I bring my hands up to guard my head and I look at him the whole time.”

The “wrong way” to duck, Lamar Davis says, is to bend your torso forward and look downward during the movement. “When I do that, I can’t see anything,” he explains. “I don’t know what’s going on up [above] for a split second — not a good thing. That’s a good time to catch an elbow or a hammerfist to the back of the head or the upper spine.”


For more information about Lamar Davis and his teachings, visit the official Hardcore Jeet Kune Do Chinese Gung Fu Association website at hjkdcgfa.com.…

Jeet Kune Do Techniques: Ted Wong Shows You How to Fix 14 Mistakes

Like the people who run most magazines, we at Black Belt love to look at surveys — in particular, surveys that tell us what you want to read. Back in the 1970s, those surveys told us you were interested in kung fu self-defense moves and jeet kune do moves.

In the ’80s, it was taekwondo techniques, ninjutsu techniques and jeet kune do techniques. In the ’90s, it was kenpo, Brazilian jiu-jitsu and jeet kune do. In the 2000s, it’s been the mixed martial arts and — you guessed it — jeet kune do.

To serve up an article about the one fighting art that has remained on everyone’s radar ever since Bruce Lee began showcasing it in movies, we talked with Ted Wong, the man many claim was Bruce Lee’s No. 1 disciple. In 2006, Ted Wong was inducted into the Black Belt Hall of Fame as Man of the Year for his ongoing efforts to propagate JKD around the world. Who better to turn to for advice on fixing the mistakes students make in their jeet kune do techniques?

Sadly, Ted Wong passed away on November 24, 2010. Before his passing, however, he shared with us the 14 mistakes he encountered most often and offered advice from his decades of experience.

JEET KUNE DO TECHNIQUES VIDEO
Ted Wong Explains the Importance of Distance, Angles and Alignment



Learn how the boxing techniques of Muhammad Ali and Joe Louis influenced
Bruce Lee’s development of jeet kune do techniques in this FREE download!
Bruce Lee Training Research: How Boxing Influenced His Jeet Kune Do Techniques


Jeet Kune Do Techniques Mistake #1: Wrong Origins

Not all aspects of JKD punching stem from wing chun kung fu, Ted Wong says. “Much of the JKD being taught today is based on wing chun structures. I have a lot of respect for wing chun, but it’s not JKD. In fact, the majority of Bruce Lee’s notes in Tao of Jeet Kune Do are from boxing and fencing.

“One of the most important phrases in his notes and in the Tao comes from a boxing book: ‘The essence of fighting is the art of moving at the right time.’ But you have to move and think like a fencer because mobility is the key in JKD or any fighting art.”

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Jeet Kune Do Techniques Mistake #2: Wrong Balance

Bruce Lee taught that the key to balance is having your head positioned vertically over the line that connects your feet, Ted Wong says. “If it’s not and your opponent forces you to move backward, you have nowhere to go while staying balanced.”


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Even worse, you can’t follow up when your balance is off. You’re basically limited to your initial jeet kune do moves, be it a punch or a kick, because you’re not in a position to throw another one with any power, he says.

In some instances — specifically, when your opponent is backing up after your first strike — you’ll need to pursue him with follow-up shots. That’s when you really have to keep your head over the line between your feet so you can quickly close the distance.

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Jeet Kune Do Techniques Mistake #3: Wrong Stance

Bruce Lee developed the JKD stance for a reason: It serves a fighter well in the greatest variety of situations. All the more reason not to abandon it as you face different opponents — a grappler, for instance.


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“If you make your stance too wide, you cannot move,” Ted Wong says. “A grappler will pick you up and throw you to the floor. If you keep the proper stance while your opponent shoots for your front leg, however, you can quickly move back and hit him.”

Remember to keep your balance forward for maximum power, he adds.

In order to execute jeet kune do moves correctly, you need the proper JKD stance. To construct the right stance, imagine a line between you and your opponent. The toe of your front foot should be on that line, as should the arch of your rear foot. An isosceles triangle is formed with your lead toe at the top and your rear heel and rear toe at the bottom vertexes.

“If you have an open stance like a boxer, that line will point away from your opponent, and you’ll lose your power structure,” Ted Wong says. “One key part of …

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