Kung Fu

A new study in the Annals of Internal Medicine found that tai chi seemed as effective as conventional exercise in reducing the waist size of middle age and older adults who suffered from central obesity. The study, conducted by researchers at the University of Hong Kong, the Chinese University of Hong Kong, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, and UCLA, examined more than 500 test subjects 50 years old and above.

The researchers randomly assigned volunteers to one of three groups: a non-exercise group, a group that did aerobic and strength exercises, and a group that practiced Yang style tai chi. Participants in the latter two groups exercised or practiced tai chi for one hour three days a week and were measured after 12 weeks and again after 38 weeks. The group practicing tai chi saw about the same reduction in their waist lines as the group doing standard exercises.

Black Belt is proud to announce NEW online mini-courses with Sifu Damien Chauremootoo.

In Australia, one reality-based training organization stands out: Empower Tactical in Melbourne. Under the leadership of Damien Chauremootoo, Empower Tactical has built a reputation for results in the self-defense world, and now its courses, which combine street savvy and a scientific knowledge of biomechanics with proven strategies and effective techniques, are being made available around the world.

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Axie Breen Photography

The wide smile and palpable positive energy of Kathy Yang are the first things a student notices when watching her instructional videos.

Whether teaching White Crane or Long Fist styles of Kung Fu or Qigong exercises and sets, Yang conveys her instruction in a unique way that is easy to follow and packed with information.

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Nuns from the Drukpa lineage of Tibetan Buddhism, better known as the "Kung Fu Nuns," have been named as finalists for the prestigious Václav Havel Human Rights Prize. The Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe, which established the award in 2013, cited not only the nuns work promoting gender equality, environmental sustainability and intercultural tolerance but their teaching self defense to women across the Himalayas region as reasons for their nomination.

The order, which primarily lives and trains at Druk Amitabha Mountain Nunnery in Nepal, began practicing kung fu a decade ago as a means of empowerment and have since been active in the fight against human trafficking and in bringing pandemic relief aid to remote villages over the past year. The other two finalists for this year's prize, Loujain al-Hathloul of Saudi Arabia and Julienne Lusenge of the Democratic Republic of Congo, are also noted for their work promoting women's rights.