Kung Fu

The temple or monastery of Shaolin was built, according to some old documents and legends, in 495 (497?) AD by the Chinese emperor Hsiao Vhena when an Indian monk called Bhadri (Batuo) arrived and started preaching Buddhism there. The old documents, as well as narratives, claim that building lasted for about twenty years.

The monastery is situated in the central China in a mountainous region, surrounded by forests at the foot of the mountain Shao Shi after which it got its name (Shao-mount, Lin- forest). It is near the village Song Shan, the town Zhengzhov and the city of Louynag in the province Henan, and surrounded by the mountain chain Wu-tai.

Next to the temple there are 220 pagodas, built from 8th (791AD) to 19th century(1803). The Chinese name for the temple is Pinyin Shaolin-si. It has been the sacred place of Zen Buddhism (the Buddhist temple – Mahayana Chan of Zen Buddhism) to the Chinese and newcomers from India.

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Internal Martial Arts: Chenhan Yang

Building Better People Through Martial Arts

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Internal Martial Arts: Chenhan Yang

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Chenhan Yang is President of Shouyu Liang Wushu Taiji Qigong Institute, and also a gifted teacher with five volumes of DVD programs covering Chen Tai Chi and BaGua. How do great martial artists arrive where they are? What lessons can they teach us? Yang shared his martial arts journey, and why studying martial arts is an important part of his life. Read on for his intriguing story.

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