Daniel Larusso Karate Kid

There are few things simpler than the law of success. If you are consistent and persistent, eventually, you should arrive at your goal. Pretty simple, right? It is, but as the wise Jim Rohn used to say, "What's simple to do, is also simple not to do." Here are some tips to get the most out of every day.


How Often Is More Important Than How Long

Karate

www.liveabout.com

So, what does that mean, exactly? Here is an example a teacher gave me once.

"Well, I can only practice for 10 minutes…"

The teacher shrugged. "OK, do it for 10 minutes."

"Some days, I can only manage 5."

"OK, do it for 5," he answered, unmoved.

"Most days, were talking 2 minutes."

Finally, he gave the pearl of wisdom, "I don't care how long, just do it every day."

Rather than spending hours on perfecting a technique (kick, punch, throw, etc) and then not touching it for days or weeks, do it for a few minutes each day. Repetition over a long period of time will work the material into your body for good. Any time I ever crammed for a test the information seemed to fly out of my head quickly afterward. Go for long term gain and work on things often no matter how long.


Don't Practice Things That Don't Need Practice

Don't practice what you're are already good at doing. We love to though, don't we? However, improvement comes from doing those things that are neglected, but necessary, and we know it, don't we? As much fun as it is to do things we're already good at, (possibly show off?) to get the most out of our time and attention, we really need to start hitting those things that make us roll our eyes in frustration, until we feel like we can move them over to the "totally awesome" category.

Work Slow

Tai Chi

cdn.britannica.com

There are times to work on speed, (and I am working on something to address that coming soon), but if you are trying to improve something, you'll likely need to pull it apart and put it back together again slowly. Try ultra-slow. I mean so slow that Tai Chi speed seems like a Donnie Yen fight scene. Use video or a mirror (preferably both) and take out the "uglies" until your movement looks like your gliding on ball bearings. If it's a mess slow, it's a mess fast, you just may not realize it.

Keep Moving Forward

Most of these points address consistency, but for your hard work to have any tangible results you have to be persistent and keep moving forward. All our excuses melt away when we realize that they get us no closer to our goal. Am I really, super busy, or just super distracted? If I spent as much time practicing as I do on social media could I make some progress? We know what's true, don't we? Whether you are pursuing your next rank, next competition, next technique or just trying to spend more time off the couch than on, try these simple to follow instructions and begin your pursuit and capture of that once elusive goal.

How will you perform at the moment of truth?

What's going to happen to you physically and emotionally in a real fight where you could be injured or killed? Will you defend yourself immediately, hesitate during the first few critical seconds of the fight, or will you be so paralyzed with fear that you won't be able to move at all? The answer is - you won't know until you can say, "Been there, done that." However, there is a way to train for that fearful day.

Keep Reading Show less

John Wayne Parr will make his highly anticipated ONE Championship debut against Nieky Holzken at ONE on TNT III on Wednesday, April 21.

The ONE Super Series Muay Thai bout will be contested at a catchweight.

Parr is a true legend of martial arts. The talented Aussie has a long track record and will be returning to showcase his skills on the global stage of ONE to a whole new audience of spectators around the globe. But he will be challenged by one of the top strikers in the world.

Holzken is the current #1-ranked lightweight kickboxing contender.

But on Wednesday, these two mighty warriors will dawn the four-ounce gloves in their bout.

Keep Reading Show less

Dr. Craig's Martial Arts Movie Lounge

In Part I, aspects of fight choreography were explored, like the value of actors learning en garde poses and stances as to avoid a snake oil sensibility, and how camera movement and increased coverage helped to conceal and reveal the contrived nature of Cobra Kai's fights in Season 1 (S1). Part II will add to this discussion and focus on S2 and S3's oners.
Keep Reading Show less