Joint Locks

New Jean Jacques Machado Grappling DVDs Coming Soon! Set Will Feature Submission Grappling, Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu and Mixed-Martial Arts Techniques!

Based on their acclaimed best-selling book of the same name, Jean Jacques Machado and Jay Zeballos’ highly anticipated three-DVD set, The Grappler’s Handbook: Gi and No-Gi Techniques, serves as a martial arts multimedia companion wherein the two Brazilian jiu-jitsu masters demonstrate takedowns, chokes, holds and submissions in living color and in exhaustive detail. Filmed at the Jean Jacques Machado Academy in Los Angeles, this set will offer multi-angle coverage (front, three-quarters and overhead) of each technique with step-by-step instructions, contextual explanations for each technique’s application, and an optional on-screen subtitle track with page-specific book references for an even deeper learning experience!

BRAZILIAN JIU-JITSU DVD TRAILER VIDEO
Jean Jacques Machado and Jay Zeballos’ Upcoming Three-Disc Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu DVD Set Demonstrates Techniques Found in The Grappler’s Handbook: Gi and No-Gi Techniques Book


Special features in this set will include the following:

Jean Jacques Machado and Jay Zeballos demonstrate a Brazilian jiu-jitsu takedown.

Techniques featured in this set will include (but certainly will not be limited to) the following:

  • Closed Guard to Back Control
  • Gi Choke Using Sleeve Control
  • Omo Plata Reversal When Opponent Posts One Leg
  • Guard Pass Defense to Brabo Choke
  • Arm Drag to Back Control to Rear-Naked Choke
  • Progressive Attacks From Leg-on-Shoulder Closed Guard
  • Double-Underhook Pass to Crucifix
  • Leg Sweep Butterfly-Guard Pass
  • Side-Control Escape Counter to Armbar
  • Tripod Choke
  • Anaconda Choke From Turtle Top
  • Jumping to Closed Guard
  • Butterfly Guard
  • Arm Trap to Shoulder Lock to Strikes
  • Reversal From Closed Guard
  • Standing Guard Break With Pass
  • Triangle Choke From Open Guard

DO YOU HAVE THE BOOK? … NO???!!! … STEP UP TO THE MAT!
If you’re interested in these upcoming DVDs, the book on which they are based is available in our online store! World-renowned teacher Jean Jacques Machado highlights the secrets behind gi and no-gi techniques for martial artists of all levels to successfully transition between styles.


Learn Two Closed-Guard Submissions From Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Legend Jean Jacques Machado in New BJJ Video!

In this exclusive Brazilian jiu-jitsu video filmed at Black Belt, Jean Jacques Machado — former national and international grappling tournament champion, recent red-and-black-striped belt recipient (from Rickson Gracie), 2011 Black Belt Hall of Fame Instructor of the Year, and author of the best-selling The Grappler’s Handbook Vol. 1: Gi and No-Gi Techniques and The Grappler’s Handbook Vol. 2: Tactics for Defense — shows you two closed-guard submissions.

BRAZILIAN JIU-JITSU VIDEO
Grappler’s Handbook Vol. 2 Author Jean Jacques Machado Shows You Two Submissions From the Closed Guard



From the closed guard, Machado controls his opponent by circling his right hand under the man’s left arm and grabbing his wrist as he extends the arm. Machado turns to his right, opens his guard, puts both feet on the mat and rises onto his right elbow. At the same time, he wraps his left arm over the man’s left arm and locks his left hand on top of his right wrist. Keeping the opponent’s elbow close to his chest, Machado lies back. He turns his upper body toward his foe, forcing his wrist and elbow over his own back, thus completing the shoulder lock. For added control, Machado places his right leg across the man’s back to prevent him from rolling forward to escape.

As an alternative approach to fighting from the closed guard, Machado turns to his right as he opens his guard and puts his feet on the mat. He then maneuvers his torso up and to the right so he can wrap his left arm around the man’s left shoulder. With the opponent’s left arm secure, Machado drives his hips forward, forcing him onto his back. Machado releases his hold on the arm and settles into the mount position.


NEW JEAN JACQUES MACHADO BOOK!
Jean Jacques Machado recently joined forces with Jay Zeballos to write The Grappler’s Handbook Vol. 2: Tactics for Defense. It covers a variety of topics that pertain to submission fighting, Brazilian jiu-jitsu and MMA, including defense from the bottom, head and neck protection, defense against back control and the intricacies of the guard. Rave reviews of the full-color, large format book are being posted all over the Web, confirming its status as a must-have for all grapplers! CLICK HERE FOR MORE!


If you liked the above video, then keep an eye out for the NEW companion-DVD set for Machado’s acclaimed book The Grappler’s Handbook: Gi and No-Gi Techniques. This highly anticipated three-disc set will feature many of the book’s techniques demonstrated with crisply edited three-angle coverage! Each DVD in the set will include an optional caption track detailing what pages in the book further discuss each on-screen technique and its application on the mat. Special features include a look at the making of the book, as well as Machado recalling the day Rickson Gracie awarded him the coveted red-and-black-striped belt. Much like its source book, this DVD set will be a must-have for all grapplers!…

Free Jujitsu Techniques E-Book From George Kirby

Can empty-hand jujitsu techniques improve your weapon skills? We asked our friend George Kirby this question, and the result is our latest free ebook—Basic Jujitsu Techniques: 4 Budoshin Moves to Improve Your Jujitsu Weapons Training.

Long before the Brazilian jiu-jitsu tidal wave washed over the world, George Kirby was diligently spreading the gospel of traditional jujitsu across the Western Hemisphere. Now a 10th-degree black belt, George Kirby is our go-to guy for jujitsu techniques and principles, which is why we inducted him into our Hall of Fame as our 2007 Instructor of the Year.

Despite its reputation as “the gentle art,” jujitsu provides a solid foundation for weapons training. In our free ebook, George Kirby will teach you how to make your weapon an extension of your body. As an added bonus, George Kirby also will show you four empty-hand jujitsu techniques. Here’s just a taste of what you’ll learn.

George Kirby Jujitsu Technique: Inner-Sweeping Hip Throw

Jujitsu Master George Kirby performs an inner-sweeping hip throw

1) Assume a ready position facing your attacker.
2) Block his right punch with your left forearm.
3) Step in close with your right foot, pivoting on your left foot. Your right arm should go underneath his left arm around his body. (This is just one method of grabbing your opponent for a hip throw. Usually, the height and weight of your opponent will determine how you grab him with your right hand.)
4) Hold the attacker tight against you. Your right foot should be just inside and in front of his right foot. Your right hip does not block his right hip as much as in the basic hip throw.
5) Push your right foot and leg outward against his to sweep his leg out and up. Continue to move like with a basic hip throw, balancing on your left leg.
6) Once your opponent is thrown, drop your right knee into his armpit for a submission.

We hope you enjoy George Kirby’s Basic Jujitsu Techniques. Are there any other topics that you’d like us to explore? Let us know what you think in the comments field.

(George Kirby is a 10th-degree black belt in jujitsu as well as an internationally recognized martial arts instructor and author of five books, jujitsu DVDS and magazine articles. George Kirby is also the co-founder of the American Ju-Jitsu Association. To learn more about these and other basic jujitsu techniques, check out Jujitsu: Basic Techniques of the Gentle Art Expanded Edition by George Kirby.)

How to Use Krav Maga for Self-Defense Against a Shirt Grab!

Would you know what to do if an attacker grabbed your shirt in a bar, at an ATM or on the street? Krav maga expert Alain Cohen shows you a simple yet fiercely effective krav maga counterattack for exactly this situation in this excerpt from his six-DVD krav maga set, Krav Maga Personal Protection: The Israeli Method of Close-Quarters Combat!

This simple yet effective krav maga counterattack to shirt grabs involves a joint lock and gross-motor pressure-point manipulation to take down an attacker quickly and decisively in a one-two movement!

The key to this krav maga technique is in making the attacker’s body part of yours. As Alain Cohen explains, “When he’s grabbing me, I have to make his fist a part of my body. And if my body will turn, all his arm will turn.” The one-two movement is described as a press-down on the attacker’s grabbing hand with a slight forward press with the shoulder, followed by the abrupt turn of the whole body to effectively force the attacker into a submissive position, taking him down to a more manageable place for strikes, joint locks such as elbow locks, wrist locks or other vital-target counterattacks.

A slight variant of this technique involves just the body turn, which disrupts the attacker’s alignment and opens him up for the forward press with your shoulder. This acts as a blunt pressing force against his wrist, his arm and his shoulder in their weakened positions and brings the attacker to the ground.

KRAV MAGA VIDEO | Alain Cohen Shows You How to Use Krav Maga for Self-Defense Against a Shirt Grab!


In his six-DVD krav maga set, Krav Maga Personal Protection: The Israeli Method of Close-Quarters Combat, Alain Cohen provides self-defense instruction spanning six belt levels (from yellow to black), from krav maga basics to advanced techniques.

Topics on this krav maga DVD set include:

  • punches | strikes
  • kicks from the guard
  • 360-degree defense tactics
  • gun defenses | knife defenses
  • improvised weapons
  • falls | rolls
  • grab counters
  • sweeps | throws | chokes
  • working in the guard
  • joint locks | kicks
  • third-party protection
  • grenade disarms
  • the Z lock
  • tai sabaki (body movement)
  • police locks
  • vital-point attacks
  • real-world scenario simulations

Alain Cohen is an official krav maga and Thai boxing instructor authorized by the Israeli Sports Ministry and a former member of the Israeli Defense Forces. Alain Cohen also teaches tactical krav maga to security for air marshals, pilots and crews.…

Fight Smart in Close-Quarters Combat Using Wing Chun Techniques

In the martial arts, one school of thought holds that you should change your game to match your opponent’s. Example: If you’re a stand-up fighter and you’re facing a grappler, you should immediately switch into grappling mode. Problem is, that requires you to train to such an extent that each subset of your skills is superior to the skills of a person who focuses on only that range of combat. Your grappling must be better than a grappler’s, your kicking must be better than a kicker’s and your punching must be better than a puncher’s. It’s a tough task, to be sure.

Another school of thought holds that you should never fight force with the same kind of force. In other words, don’t try to beat your opponent at what he does best. Instead, use a set of concepts and techniques that will enable you to nullify his attacks and nail him when he’s not expecting it. The best set of concepts I’ve found is called the science of wing chun, as taught by Black Belt Hall of Fame member William Cheung. It offers a strategic approach to combat that’s guaranteed to help any stand-up fighter prevail on the street.

Before beginning, a few words about wing chun are in order. Supposedly developed by a woman named Yim Wing Chun, the system is based on scientific principles that allow the practitioner to achieve peak performance in any combat situation, even against a larger opponent. It does so by teaching you how to fight smarter, not harder. The key to achieving that goal lies in the following seven principles.

Wing Chun Principle #1: Maintain a Balanced Stance

When you’re in a balanced wing chun stance, your opponent won’t be able to read your intentions because you’re not telegraphing the way you’ll fight. He can’t discern your commitment to any move or to any direction.

The stance requires a 50-50 weight distribution at all times. That enables you to move either foot in any direction at any time. Having maximum mobility, at a moment’s notice, is essential for dealing with armed or multiple attackers. Being balanced also conserves energy, which allows you to channel it to other uses while under attack.

Once your opponent moves, wing chun teaches that you should immediately shift into a side neutral stance based on the side of your body he attacks. If he comes from your right, you deal with him by using your right arm and right foot, and vice versa. Your stance is now similar to that of a boxer, except that you’re oriented at a 45-degree angle so you’re less open to his blows.

Wing Chun Technique #1: Leg Sweep

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William Cheung (left) faces his opponent, Eric Oram, in a side neutral stance (1). Oram throws a left jab toward Cheung’s right side, causing Cheung to counter with a right palm strike (2). The opponent then tries a roundhouse punch, which Cheung counters with a finger-thrust block (3). He tries to force his roundhouse punch but Cheung moves with the arm and maintains control of the elbow (4). The wing chun master then hits him with an elbow strike (5) before taking him down with a leg sweep (6-7). He finishes with a series of punches to the head (8).

Wing Chun Principle #2 Attack Your Opponent’s Balance

In any kind of fighting, balance is everything. Strive to maintain yours while attacking your opponent’s. Often, that entails getting him to lean too far into his technique, overcommit to his movement or overextend his body. Without proper balance, he won’t be able to move, block or strike effectively.

In general, grapplers employ a strategy that involves an overzealous commitment to a move. They’ll lean, lunge or throw themselves forward in an effort to take you to the ground, which is their preferred environment. At that point, they’ll attempt to mount you and punch, or they’ll choke you unconscious. That’s all well and good as long as you don’t take advantage of their momentary lack of balance.

In wing chun, you control your opponent’s balance and then deflect his force primarily by controlling his elbow. As Cheung likes to say, if you control his elbow, you can control his balance.

Wing Chun Technique #2: Balance Disruption

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The opponent (left) closes the distance and grabs William Cheung’s right arm (1-2). Cheung interrupts his balance with a palm-strike push aimed at the man’s elbow (3). He then pulls the trapped limb down to effect a standing armbar (4). Cheung pushes the opponent to the floor (5) and neutralizes him with punches (6).

Wing Chun Principle #3: Control Your Opponent’s Elbow

Always watch your adversary’s lead elbow. Why the elbow? Because whenever a person’s arm moves to strike you, so does …

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