Don Rodrigues and Christine Bannon-Rodrigues

Two Black Belt Magazine Hall of Famers join Jackson in this episode as iconic Team Paul Mitchell Coach Don Rodrigues and legendary competitor Christine Bannon-Rodrigues talk all things sport karate. Hear some Paul Mitchell stories that have never been told before and so much more in Episode 45.

Black Belt Magazine has a storied history that dates back all the way to 1961, making 2021 the 60th Anniversary of the world's leading magazine of martial arts. To celebrate six decades of legendary martial arts coverage, take a trip down memory lane by scrolling through some of the most influential covers ever published. From the creators of martial art styles, to karate tournament heroes, to superstars on the silver screen, and everything in between, the iconic covers of Black Belt Magazine act as a time capsule for so many important moments and figures in martial arts history. Keep reading to view the full list of these classic issues.

Keep Reading Show less

In a back and forth battle, Charles Oliveira finally claimed UFC gold winning the lightweight title against Michael Chandler in Houston, TX Saturday night. And Oliveira, the UFC's all time submission king with 14 wins via that route, did it on his feet knocking Chandler out in the second round.

The Brazilian opened with low kicks but Chandler quickly took the fight to him scoring a damaging left hook. He then dropped to the ground attempting a guillotine choke but Oliveira worked out of it to take Chandler's back. The American was eventually able to explode out of the position and regain his feet though, from there raining punches down on the prone Oliveira.

Keep Reading Show less

Every Sport karate competitor knows how hard it is to get through one routine, let alone several of them. Each routine is only about a minute and a half, but this minute and a half is composed of nonstop hard- hitting movements that take a lot of energy from the body. The more events a competitor competes in, the more in tune they need to be with their body and training. I typically compete in six events (some of which all are ran the same night, within the span of just over an hour). After those six divisions are completed, if I were to win any of the events, there are other rounds; "overall grands", which means I would compete again the following day. There is a very specific type of training that needs to be done in order to obtain success inside the ring.

Keep Reading Show less