Tang Soo Do

Tang Soo Do Self-Defense Moves Video: C.S. Kim and Y.D. Kim Demonstrate an Elbow Break!

Tang Soo Do Self-Defense Moves Video: C.S. Kim and Y.D. Kim Demonstrate an Elbow Break!C.S. Kim wasn’t particularly tough when he was young.

Like millions of other kids around the world and plenty in Songtan, South Korea, he had problems with coordination and self-esteem.

What made C.S. Kim different from his peers is he found a simple solution to his problems: the martial arts.

He started judo and boxing when he was 10. Then he visited a tang soo do school run by Song Ki Kim and joined the next day.

“I loved it,” C.S. Kim said. “We trained two or three hours a day for five days a week.”

When C.S. Kim received his green belt, he thought he knew everything and stopped attending class.

Three months later, he started up again because he missed it. He worried that his master would be angry about his absence, but the old man welcomed the lost sheep back into the fold. “I never quit again,” C.S. Kim said.

TANG SOO DO SELF-DEFENSE MOVES VIDEO
C.S. Kim and Y.D. Kim Demonstrate an Elbow Break!



In 1963, C.S. Kim joined the Korean army and became head instructor at Osan Air Base — where he instructed both Korean and U.S. military personnel, including a young Chuck Norris. Learn more about Chuck Norris and his legendary films in our new FREE download: How Chuck Norris Films Seem to
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Early Training

Training was tough. “Before my master got a school, we practiced outside in the dirt,” said C.S. Kim, who earned his black belt when he was 12. “If it rained, we couldn’t practice. We didn’t have any equipment, but sometimes we used a rice bag filled with sand as a punching bag.”

C.S. Kim and his classmates spent most of their time doing kicks, punches, forms, one-step sparring and free sparring — especially free sparring. “My master would have 20 people stand up, and each student would spar for five minutes with each person,” he recalled.

Tang Soo Do Self-Defense Moves: Then and Now

The skills C.S. Kim worked to perfect then are identical to the ones he and his instructors teach now. “I don’t believe in changing techniques,” he said. “Modern instructors may create new styles, but what’s going to be around in the future? The traditional martial arts. The world changes every day, but anything traditional should not. People need some stability in life, and traditional martial arts can provide that. As we grow old and die, traditional martial arts like tang soo do can last forever.”


Tang soo do legend C.S. Kim shows you the art’s
universal lessons in this FREE download!
Tang Soo Do: How the Traditional Korean Martial Art Teaches
Universal Lessons for Effective Self-Defense Moves


Bringing a Traditional Martial Art and Its Self-Defense Moves to the World

To help promote traditional tang soo do to a wider audience, C.S. Kim left Korea in 1972. He had an opportunity to relocate to Europe but elected to settle in the United States instead. In 1973 he appeared on his first magazine cover. In 1974 he organized his first tournament, which attracted 700 people. Now based in Monroeville, Pennsylvania, he admitted that his federation’s teaching methods — but not its techniques or self-defense moves — have been modified a little to better deal with students’ busy schedules. Because of school activities and sports, children just can’t invest as much time in their training, he said.

The Positive Effects of Martial Arts Training

“But parents need to remember that martial arts can help academic studies,” C.S. Kim added. “I tell students what my master told me: On one side you have education, and on the other side you have martial arts. It’s the perfect balance.”


For more information about C.S. Kim and his self-defense moves training rooted in tang soo do and karate, visit his official website at cskimkarate.com.

Related Martial Arts Books, E-Books,
DVDs and Video Downloads

Tang Soo Do Basics — Volume 1

Hwa Rang Do: Defend, Take Down, Submit

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Power vs. Speed: The Evolution of Tang Soo Do Fighting

Power vs. Speed: The Evolution of Tang Soo Do FightingSeventh-degree black belt Dominick A. Giacobbe knows a little something about free fighting. The owner and chief instructor of the Tang Soo Karate Academy in Pine Hill, New Jersey, has trained in the Korean art of tang soo do for more than four decades.

During that time, he’s educated more than 1,000 black belts and 40-plus masters, all while finding time to further his own training under some of the finest experts in America, Korea and Japan. Among them are the renowned J.C. Shin and Black Belt Hall of Fame member C.S. Kim (1995 Man of the Year).


Tang soo do legend C.S. Kim shows you the art’s
universal lessons in this FREE download!
Tang Soo Do: How the Traditional Korean Martial Art Teaches
Universal Lessons for Effective Self-Defense Moves


From 1968 to 1978, Dominick Giacobbe reigned as a free-fighting champion on the East Coast. Fortunately for modern martial artists, he’s still eager to pass on the knowledge and experience that decade of competition gave him.

Some of his more recent tang soo do contemplations have involved the evolution of the art’s fighting method — from ancient times to the modern era. …

The Way It Was Then

The fighting art of tang soo do is believed to have originated 2,000 years ago during Korea’s Three Kingdoms period. Silla, the smallest and least populated region of the peninsula, was under constant attack from the larger and more powerful Paekje and Koguryo kingdoms. After a few centuries, the Silla rulers are believed to have allied themselves with a skilled fighting force created by the Tang dynasty monarchs of China (618-907). It was then that the tang soo warriors were born. For years, this elite group of combatants trained on the rocky beaches of southern Korea, where they honed themselves into a fierce fighting force.

Their combat system was a combination of a traditional Chinese art known as the “Tang method” and a set of powerful kicks native to Korea. It was during this time that tang soo — the “hand of Tang” — became respected and feared. The fighters garnered a reputation that was so intimidating that as recently as 30 years ago, Korean parents would discipline their children by threatening, “The tang soo man is going to get you!”

To propagate their morality, the tang soo warriors developed the Sesok Ogye, or Five-Point Code. Its tenets were the following:

  • Show loyalty to one’s king or master.
  • Be obedient to one’s parents and elders.
  • Honor friendships.
  • Never retreat in battle.
  • In killing, choose with sense and honor.

With the Five-Point Code as their philosophy, the warriors went on the offensive and eventually conquered Silla’s neighbors, unifying Korea for the first time. The consolidated dynasty lasted from 668 to 935 — cementing Korean solidarity through the Koryo dynasty (935-1392) and Yi dynasty (1392-1910). During the unification period, tang soo saw its greatest development.


Related Martial Arts Books, E-Books,
DVDs and Video Downloads

Tang Soo Do Fighting Strategies — Volume 3

Hwa Rang Do: Defend, Take Down, Submit

Warrior Odyssey: The Travels of a Martial Artist Through Asia


At the time, the art consisted solely of fighting techniques; there were no forms. The traditional style of combat was swift, aggressive and relentless. Its guiding principle was, Don’t give the opponent an opportunity to attack.

The fighting strategy emphasized the fourth line of the Five-Point Code: Never retreat in battle. Quite simply, practitioners were taught to never move backward in combat, Dominick Giacobbe says. Instead, they were instructed to charge at their opponent, attacking with a punch and following up with a series of kicks, forcing the other person to retreat. Soon the adversary was rendered unable to defend or counterattack.The tactic was not unlike that of the elite fighting forces of our era: Overpower the enemy and kill him.

After peace was established, the word do, or “way,” was appended to tang soo. Tang soo do then came to refer to the peaceful pursuit of the warrior arts, and it remains that way to this day. To further drive home the transformation, the fifth line of the code saw the word “killing” replaced by “conflict.” The new term doesn’t refer to only physical confrontations; it also applies to mental, emotional and spiritual battles.

During the Yi dynasty, arts and crafts rose to a high level, and Koreans learned the necessity of protecting their hands and fingers. Consequently, tang soo do evolved into a system that focused 80 percent of its arsenal on leg techniques — especially those that relied on the more powerful and less-likely-to-be-anticipated rear leg.

The Middle Period

Dominick Giacobbe’s first experience with traditional tang soo do fighting came around 1970 when as a green belt he received his first opportunity to spar with J.C. Shin, his first instructor at the …

Korean Martial Arts Weapons Video: Y.D. Kim Demonstrates Short Sticks vs. Bamboo Sword (Part 1)

Korean martial arts expert and tang soo do teacher Y.D. Kim at Black Belt magazine.

Master Y.D. Kim recently visited the photo studios of Black Belt magazine with his father, the esteemed C.S. Kim — president and founder of the International Tang Soo Do Federation and the 1995 Black Belt Hall of Fame Man of the Year — to demonstrate an array of Korean martial arts weapons techniques.

These basic techniques feature the dan bong (short sticks) defending against the juk do bamboo sword.

KOREAN MARTIAL ARTS WEAPONS VIDEO
Y.D. Kim Demonstrates Short Sticks vs.
Bamboo Sword (Part 1)



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“The first technique will be with the juk do,” Y.D. Kim says in this exclusive Korean martial arts weapons video filmed at Black Belt magazine, “which is the bamboo sword versus two dan bong, which is two short sticks. [This will involve] three overhead strikes with a thrust and a stab before we finish it.”

“When you defend with the dan bong, don’t strike [the bamboo sword] and keep the stick going straight out,” Y.D. Kim continues. “You’ll want to vibrate back and forth. As soon as they swing downward with the bamboo sword, move in to strike the attacker with one dan bong in a slashing manner. Then come around for the reverse strike with the end of the other dan bong to the solar plexus area.”


About the Artist:
Y.D. Kim is the head instructor at the Y.D. Kim Karate and Fitness center headquartered in Arlington, Texas. He is the son of grandmaster C.S. Kim, a two-time Korean tang soo do champion and former chairman of the U.S. Tang Soo Do Federation Moo Duk Kwan who also served as U.S. team coach at the first World Championships. C.S. Kim is also the author of two tang soo do DVDs in the Black Belt library. Both DVDs — Tang Soo Do Basics — Volume 1 and Tang Soo Do Basics — Volume 2 are out of print, but both are available — along with more than 125 other titles — in the DVD Downloads section of the Black Belt Store.…

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World-champion breaker Leif Becker instructs Black Belt’s very own multimedia manager Rachelle Lagnado in the art of board breaking. In this exclusive video, Rachelle learns how to break a series of double boards!


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World-champion breaker Leif Becker instructs Black Belt’s very own multimedia manager Rachelle Lagnado in the art of board breaking. In this exclusive video, Rachelle learns the body mechanics of breaking.