wing chun kung fu

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The name of Louis Damien Chauremootoo is engraved on a commemorative plaque in the province of Henan, China. Erected on the occasion of the great return of Wing Chun to the Shaolin Temple. This sculpture also includes the names of Robert Downey Jr. and William Cheung, Grand Master of the traditional Wing Chun and direct disciple of the legendary Ip Man. It was under the tutelage of Grand Master William Cheung that Louis Damien Chauremootoo perfected his mastery of Wing Chun Kung-Fu and became an instructor.

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by Darren Chesnut

Master Wong Shares His Insights on the Role Awareness Should Play in Your Training and Proves Why He's Become a YouTube Sensation!

Start With the Right Philosophy!

All martial arts are good, Master Wong says. However, people often believe otherwise because they see moves that are done differently from what they're used to in their style and they seem ineffective."People want to learn, and when they don't understand, they start to slag each other off," he says. "Newcomers don't know any different. When things like that happen, students get confused."A good instructor needs to educate students, teach them that nothing is best and everything is good. The key is the context in everyday life in which you use it. As long as you make use of it to change you, to become a better version of yourself, to improve yourself, it is good for you."People may learn martial arts to fight, to hurt others, even to kill others. But martial arts are about the mindset that comes with training the body, mind and spirit. When people don't understand that, they put fighting on top of everything."


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Western critics loved this film about Bruce Lee's teacher even though most of them probably missed the numerous nods to the true martial arts lifestyle.

The Grandmaster (2013) is the first and only kung fu movie to come from Hong Kong film auteur Wong Kar-wai, but by no means does it suffer because of that. In fact, Western critics loved The Grandmaster — even though most probably didn’t grasp its full meaning. Wong is no noob when it comes to filmmaking. His resume includes Happy Together (1997), In the Mood for Love (2000) and My Blueberry Nights (2007). So when he conceived of The Grandmaster as an authentic depiction of wing chun kung fu that features purposefully hidden martial arts nuances, it’s safe to say he knew what he was doing. You can’t blame the reviewers for failing to notice those concealed treasures. The truth is, anyone who’s not a martial arts practitioner likely won’t appreciate the subtleties of the film. Zhang Zi Yi (Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon; Hero; House of Flying Daggers) as the daughter of Gong Yu-tian. Before Wong Kar-wai started shooting the movie, he devoted several years to research, roaming around China in search of old kung fu masters. He even lived with a few so he could learn about and actually experience the traditions of the martial arts. During that time, many of those masters shared stories that otherwise would never have been told.

Have you read Bruce Lee: Wisdom for the Way? It’s a must for all martial artists. Order your copy here — it’s on sale!

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Black Belt's entertainment blogger has a personal story to tell about Bruce Lee, and it has the potential to benefit all martial artists.

On July 20, 1973, Bruce Lee passed away at age 32. After so many years, there’s very little anyone who didn’t know him on an intimate level can add to any conversation about his legacy. Yet on a personal level, everyone has a story to share about the “Little Dragon.” Mine is the subject of this blog. I actually have two Bruce Lee stories to share. One you may know, and the other you probably don't. The 75th anniversary of Bruce Lee's birth is celebrated in the August/September 2015 issue of Black Belt. When I was 16, I was forced to down 30 pills a day and required to report to the hospital every three months. My doctor said I'd be dead in five years due to cystic fibrosis, a progressive, incurable disease. Death by malnutrition, suffocation, dehydration and lung infection was what I had to look forward to. Two weeks later, I watched Bruce Lee kick butt in Fists of Fury (aka The Big Boss). It was 1973, and all of a sudden I was no longer depressed and waiting to die. All I could think about was learning what Lee was doing. As I immersed myself in the martial arts, I found that their real purpose is not to convey ways of fighting but to spread the art of healing. And I needed to heal myself. I discovered one chance for survival: an ancient Chinese healing skill that was seldom taught to outsiders.

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In this vintage video footage, wing chun kung fu grandmaster William Cheung demonstrates the wooden dummy as a training tool for kung fu techniques.

Practice is the key to mastery in any martial art. Execution of thousands of strikes, kicks and blocks against a partner is the key to integrating the strategies and techniques in such a way that they become second nature. However, live partners are not always available. So the next best thing, of course, would be a stand-in — and that's where the wooden dummy comes in for the practice necessary for mastering kung fu techniques when a human partner's participation isn't possible. Training devices such as the wooden dummy have been used by China's Shaolin Temple fighting monks for more than 2,000 years. "There was a corridor that consisted of 108 wooden dummies representing 108 different attacking techniques," says wing chun expert andBlack BeltHall of Fame member William Cheung. "The monks would move down the hall and practice their defenses and counterattacks on them." In this kung fu techniques video, William Cheung demonstrates how kung fu practitioners can use a device such as the wooden dummy to practice their own defenses and counterattacks. William Cheung then demonstrates the practiced kung fu techniques on his training partner and senior disciple, Eric Oram

KUNG FU TECHNIQUES VIDEO Grandmaster William Cheung Demonstrates Wing Chun Kung Fu Training Techniques and Applications Using the Wooden Dummy

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10 Wing Chun Kung Fu Training Principles Any Martial Artist Can Use!

Construction and Functionality of the Wooden Dummy for Wing Chun Kung Fu Training

"The three arms on the dummy can represent strikes to the middle and upper gates and can be either punches or kicks," explains Wiliam Cheung disciple and wing chun techniques expert Eric Oram. "The leg of the dummy teaches the wing chun practitioner to move from one side of the dummy to the other, keeping in mind where the opponent's lead leg is at all times."

The First Modern Wooden Dummy for Wing Chun Techniques Practice

"In 1951 my brother George Cheung ... persuaded Hong Kong-based wing chun legend Yip Man to commission a carpenter to build the first wooden dummy outside of China," William Cheung recalls. "It was built and installed on the rooftop of my family's house on Argyle Street in Kowloon, Hong Kong. I've been training on the wooden dummy ever since.

"In 1956 [George] went to Sydney, Australia, to attend university. He brought that dummy to Sydney with him. When he moved in 1959, he placed it in the care of a friend who ran a gas station. One winter's night when the temperature plummeted, [George's] friend used the dummy as firewood to keep himself warm. It was a sudden and tragic end for the first modern wooden dummy."

Safety First in Your Wing Chun Kung Fu Training

Because the wooden dummy is usually made of teak, it's essential to practice all your offensive and defensive kung fu techniques slowly and softly at first to minimize the impacts your body is forced to absorb. As your accuracy and technique improve, you can put more energy and intention into it.


Related Martial Arts Books, E-Books, DVDs and Video Downloads

For more detailed information on wing chun training using the wooden dummy, live partners and a variety of weapons, please refer to the William Cheung wing chun training DVD series Wing Chun Kung Fu (Volumes 1 - 5). You also can visit grandmaster William Cheung's official website at cheungswingchun.com. For more information on Eric Oram, visit the website for his Wing Chun Kung Fu Chinese Boxing Academy & Mind/Body Center in West Los Angeles at lawingchun.com.

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