wally jay small circle jujitsu

This article is the third of three excerpts from the Wally Jay book Small-Circle Jujitsu, in which the late founder describes the foundational ideas of his system of jujitsu techniques. These concepts are essential reading for anyone looking to get started in the art — or, on the opposite end of the spectrum, to get back to basics and address negative habits that may have developed over the years. Read Wally Jay's 10 Principles for Execution of Small-Circle Jujitsu Techniques (Part 1 of 3)! Read Wally Jay's 10 Principles for Execution of Small-Circle Jujitsu Techniques (Part 2 of 3)! Wally Jay's Small-Circle Jujitsu Techniques — Principle #9: Rotational Momentum Rotational momentum is one of the major types of movement in small-circle jujitsu techniques. Henry Okazaki demonstrated this back in 1944. It is a method of creating strong off-balancing moves as a preliminary to throwing the opponent. By holding the opponent with both hands, you circle both hands in the same direction. One hand pulls while the other pushes. As the opponent leans to oppose your influence, you circle back, adding your force to his own body momentum to shift him off-balance. Wally Jay's Small-Circle Jujitsu Techniques — Principle #10: Transitional Flow The purpose of learning the art of transitional flow for your jujitsu techniques is to enable you to counterattack any intentions of your adversary by fluidly moving from one technique to another. Watching a polished technician change jujitsu techniques is an impressive experience. He moves like a dancer instead of a brawler. He is relaxed, confident, calm, quick and mobile. His change of counter-techniques is dependent on what his attacker does. Normally, the first transitional change is sufficient to subdue the opponent. If necessary, he moves into a second transitional change.

Delve deeper into small-circle jujitsu with our new FREE Guide — Human Pressure Points: 3 Jujitsu Techniques by Small-Circle Jujitsu Founder Wally Jay — available now for FREE download!

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This article is the second of three excerpts from the Wally Jay book Small-Circle Jujitsu, in which the late founder describes the foundational ideas of his system. These concepts are essential reading for anyone looking to get started in the art — or, on the opposite end of the spectrum, to get back to basics and address negative habits that may have developed over the years. Read Wally Jay's 10 Principles for Execution of Small-Circle Jujitsu Techniques (Part 1 of 3)! Wally Jay's Small-Circle Jujitsu Techniques — Principle #5: Focus to the Smallest Point Possible (Proper Direction of Force) In transmitting the maximum amount of force and producing maximum pain, focus plays a vital part. Try to pinpoint pain to the smallest base possible. Transmission of energy to a wide base means that the energy is distributed over a larger area and less energy is directed to the point where the pain should be felt.

Go beyond these small-circle jujitsu basics with our new FREE Guide — Human Pressure Points: 3 Jujitsu Techniques by Small-Circle Jujitsu Founder Wally Jay — and learn how these ideas work in application!

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Born in Honolulu in 1917, the late small-circle jujitsu founder Wally Jay held a 10th dan in jujitsu and a sixth dan in judo. He was inducted into the Black Belt Hall of Fame in 1969 and 1990 for his outstanding contributions to jujitsu and the martial arts overall. In this first of three excerpts from his book, Small-Circle Jujitsu, Wally Jay delves into the four of the 10 principles he discovered and developed as the foundation of his small-circle jujitsu system. The following principles form the basis of small-circle jujitsu techniques. They follow the laws of sports science, and through many years of research, have enhanced the science of jujitsu. Wally Jay's Small-Circle Jujitsu Techniques — Principle #1: Balance Balance is perhaps the most important principle in any sport. The basic strategy of judo, for instance, is to keep your opponent off-balance while maintaining your own. By keeping your own balance, you will have use of your maximum power in your jujitsu techniques while your opponent uses part of his energy trying to regain his balance. The more off-balance he is, the more strength he will need to recover. Wally Jay's Small-Circle Jujitsu Techniques — Principle #2: Mobility and Stability Your center of gravity plays an important part in the principle of mobility and stability. Lower your center of gravity and you will achieve stability; raise your center of gravity and you will gain mobility. The hub of your action during jujitsu techniques is at your midsection. When your center of gravity rises, you lessen your stability and increase your mobility, and vice versa.

Improve your jujitsu game with our new FREE Guide — Human Pressure Points: 3 Jujitsu Techniques by Small-Circle Jujitsu Founder Wally Jay — available now for FREE download!

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Professor Wally Jay is a twice-inducted Black Belt Hall of Fame member (Jiu-Jitsu Sensei of the Year, 1969; Man of the Year, 1990), 10th dan in jujutsu under Juan Gomez (a top disciple of Henry S. Okazaki) and a sixth dan in judo under Ken Kawachi. Professor Wally Jay is one of the few martial artists this century to have come up with a theory of fighting, developed it and put it into practice. His influence is felt throughout the martial arts industry. Small-Circle Jujitsu DVD Volume 1 discusses the 10 basic principles of small-circle jujutsu, including an explanation and demonstration of finger, wrist and joint locking.

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