taky kimura

Members of the martial arts community — and followers of the arts of Bruce Lee, in particular — suffered a loss on January 7, 2021, when Seattle-based instructor Taky Kimura passed away at age 96. He had been the most senior living student of Lee and one of only three people (along with Dan Inosanto and the late James Yimm Lee) certified by Lee to teach.

He had been the most senior living student of Lee and one of only three people (along with Dan Inosanto and the late James Yimm Lee) certified by Lee to teach. Taky, the son of Japanese immigrants, was born and raised in Washington state. He was the only person of Japanese descent in his high school, but according to his son Andy Kimura, he was treated well in the community and rarely experienced discrimination.

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Get the inside scoop on this epic 3,500-page downloadable collection, news of which garnered an astounding 88,000+ “likes” on the Bruce Lee Facebook page!

The new downloadable Bruce Lee time capsule —Black Belt Magazine: The Bruce Lee Collection— has garnered a big response from Bruce Lee fans online. The official Bruce Lee page on Facebook recently posted an announcement regarding this new landmark collection and found themselves swimming in:

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Bruce Lee and jeet kune do historian Tommy Gong, author of Bruce Lee: The Evolution of a Martial Artist, explores the importance of Lee's legacy as a resource for martial artists who seek to continue their own evolution.

Editor's Note: This text is adapted for Web presentation from Tommy Gong's acclaimed book Bruce Lee: The Evolution of a Martial Artist. The term Jun Fan jeet kune do was adopted in January 1996, during a landmark summit meeting in Seattle with Linda Lee Cadwell and Shannon Lee, along with many of Bruce's first-generation students. This meeting served as the precursor to the formation of the JFJKD Nucleus/Bruce Lee Educational Foundation. Actually, it was Shannon Lee's suggestion to merge the two terms (Jun Fan gung fu and jeet kune do) to describe her father’s complete journey in martial arts, and everyone in attendance unanimously agreed. Jun Fan jeet kune do serves as the definitive case study for Jun Fan gung fu and jeet kune do because it endeavors to give a clear and accurate picture of Bruce Lee’s legacy to martial arts — physically, scientifically and philosophically.

BRUCE LEE® and the Bruce Lee signature are registered trademarks of Bruce Lee Enterprises, LLC. The Bruce Lee name, image, likeness and all related indicia are intellectual property of Bruce Lee Enterprises, LLC. All Rights Reserved. www.brucelee.com.

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Jeet kune do authority Taky Kimura once described Kelly S. Worden as an “American icon of the progressive arts.” In this exclusive interview, Worden reveals how his mentors helped him synthesize arnis, JKD and other concepts to forge a system he calls “renegade JKD."

Jeet kune do authority Taky Kimura once described Kelly S. Worden as an “American icon of the progressive arts.” For more than 35 years, Kelly Worden has devoted his waking hours to blending and integrating a multitude of martial arts concepts to form a system of cross-training he calls Natural Spirit International. In this exclusive interview with Black Belt magazine, the University Place, Washington-based master reveals how his teachers and mentors helped him forge a system he calls “renegade JKD,” his unique path to martial arts self-discovery.

Black Belt: You started in boxing and catch wrestling before moving to isshin-ryu karate, but from the beginning, your focus has been on fighting. When did you find out your path was different from that of other traditional practitioners?

Kelly Worden: Almost immediately. I was undisciplined. There were six children in our family. My father was a disabled veteran from World War II, and much of his time was spent in a veteran’s hospital. I found myself running the streets early on and getting into a lot of fights. I enjoyed fighting, but that attitude created other problems and issues, and I left home when I was 15. Traditional isshin-ryu karate tempered my spirit and offered structured learning and self-discipline. At best, I was an aggressive, mediocre karate practitioner, but I persevered by training in different arts. Fighting was always the core of [my] approach.

Learn how the boxing techniques of Muhammad Ali and Joe Louis influenced
Bruce Lee’s development of jeet kune do techniques in this FREE download!
Bruce Lee Training Research: How Boxing Influenced His Jeet Kune Do Techniques

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