submissions techniques

In this exclusive NEW video, the grappling, judo and MMA-training legend shows you how to take your opponent to the ground and stop him in his tracks!

If you're into real grappling techniques, only a few names should come to mind — and one of them should definitely be Gokor Chivichyan. Gokor Chivichyan — who was inducted into the 1997 Black Belt Hall of Fame as the Judo Instructor of the Year — is an iron-clad resource for submissions techniques ... leg locks in particular. Gokor Chivichyan's curriculum vitae, however, extends far beyond just judo. In addition to his ninth-degree black belt in the Japanese martial art, Gokor Chivichyan holds a sixth degree in sambo as well as a sixth degree in jujitsu. Prior to earning those those black belts, Gokor Chivichyan entered — and emerged victorious from — his first competition in 1971. Since then, he really hasn't stopped winning. This icon in the Armenian martial arts community now oversees nearly 30 affiliate schools in the United States and more than 40 across the Atlantic in Europe. In addition, he organizes 10 Hayastan Grappling Challenge tournaments a year in the United States, as well as another seven in Europe. In this exclusive video shot at the Hayastan MMA Academy in North Hollywood, California, Gokor Chivichyan demonstrates how to execute a takedown and heel hook.

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Born into a working-class family in Rubeshnoe Lugansk, Russia, in 1976, MMA fighter Fedor Emelianenko established himself as a man of intelligence when he graduated with honors from college in 1994. But alongside his penchant for academic achievement lived a spirit of competition. After serving two years in the Russian army, he let that side of himself surface, winning a national judo tournament and the European Sambo Championship in 1997. Five years later, he placed first at the World Sambo Championship. Grappling wasn’t the only facet of the combat arts at which, Fedor Emelianenko excelled. His punching ability grew hand in hand with his ground skills. One reason for his rapid development was his reliance on old-school training methods, such as standing out in the cold and hitting truck tires with a sledgehammer. Further assistance came from little brother Aleksander Emelianenko—who stands 6 feet 6 inches tall and weighs 275 pounds.

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