strikes

Few styles of martial arts are more involved with weapons training than Filipino Martial Arts, or FMA. For one thing, FMA (kali, arnis, escrima) begin be first teaching techniques with weapons, before moving to empty hand. So if you're interested in FMA, you need to build your familiarity with handling weapons and weapon striking. These ten strikes are a good place to start!

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If you trained under a boxing coach, this is how you'd learn to execute the lead hook and the rear uppercut. When you're done reading, click the link to examine the lead jab and the rear cross!

Punch No. 3: Lead Hook The boxing lead hook is a more or less rounded punch made with the leading hand. It whips around to the side of the opponent’s face or midsection, then snaps back. The hook draws power from translation, but this takes place in a manner unlike the jab or cross. Because the punch hits sideways, translation in the hook occurs when the bodyweight shifts from the side of the leading leg to the side of the rear leg. Power is added as the hips and shoulders rotate in the direction of the blow.

Lead hook to the chin

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When it comes to punching, nobody does it better than boxers. Check out this analysis of how pugilists generate power and speed.

These days, everywhere you look, martial artists are incorporating basic Western-boxing techniques into their fighting repertoire. Although some traditional stylists have resisted this trend, there are many good reasons why it continues and why you should jump on board. Having evolved in the laboratory of combat, boxing techniques are practical and effective. They’re deceptively powerful and rival even the powerhouse punches of classical karate in the force of their impact. They’re adaptable and combine gracefully with the strikes and kicks of the martial arts. Finally, they’re relatively easy to learn and apply even under the stress of competition or self-defense.

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A martial artist/biomechanics researcher reveals the key to quicker striking. It's all about what happens in your brain right before you execute the technique, he says.

What if someone pulled you aside one day and told you that it’s not your muscles that determine how quickly and powerfully you can hit, but the quality of your nervous system? What if that same person also told you that it’s what your nervous system is not doing that is the key?

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