self defense moves

You have a gun. They have a knife. How do you handle this situation? Close-quarters-combat expert Rob Pincus shows you in this exclusive self-defense video!

Rob Pincus is an internationally known firearms trainer who teaches both end-user and instructor-development self-defense courses. In this exclusive self-defense video, this close-quarters-combat expert shows you how to use a technique called "duck under to side control" in a situation when you have a handgun and an attacker with a knife threatens your safety

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In this combatives training video, Black Belt's Mil-Spec columnist shows you how a simple stance can make or break your chances of survival on the street!

An index position is nothing more than a stance you assume in any threatening, face-to-face situation you can’t simply walk away from. You’ll recognize when it’s appropriate to “index” because you’ll feel really uneasy and uncertain. Indexing enables you to instantly defend or attack without the appearance of being prepared to do either. Sweet! Two for one! Indexing is like cocking a firearm. When you cock a firearm, you make it ready to fire, cutting the trigger pressure that you need to fire in half. When you index, you cock your own trigger by mentally committing to a pre-emptive attack in order to protect yourself, if necessary.

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Street attacks are typically quick, brutal events intended to overwhelm the victim. Learn how "Combatives for Street Survival" author Kelly McCann stays conditioned for quick, explosive and equally brutal counterattacks in this exclusive article!

“Good to go” is a common military colloquialism indicating readiness. Are you physically good to go for performance of self-defense moves during an unexpected, violent street confrontation? Physical fitness is one of the essential preparedness prerequisites. What’s considered adequately fit in regard to defending yourself? How can it be quantified? On the no-to-low end of the spectrum, some believe fitness is irrelevant because combative techniques are supposed to incapacitate an attacker so quickly. "Supposed to," hmm? That’s a pretty naive perspective. The results of any techniques are always conditional on the street because of myriad variables that are out of your control. You can’t depend on technique, power and luck always aligning perfectly to achieve a desired outcome; “guaranteed to succeed” is a dangerous appraisal of any technique, tactic or weapon. Middle-grounders believe fitness is a requirement for effective self-defense moves and achieve their personal concept of it in different ways — from running to weightlifting to cross-training. Although well-intentioned and generally fit, some in this group may find that their conditioning program failed to adequately prepare them for the demanding and specific physical requirements of a snot-slinging fight for their life.

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Having a stronger, better-conditioned body will boost your performance regardless of which martial arts style you practice — and MMA fighters serve as a template for optimal conditioning. Learn how they eat and train so YOU can get fit to fight!

Having a stronger, better-conditioned body will boost your performance regardless of which martial arts style you practice. That’s why it makes sense to look at MMA fighters — who are some of the best-conditioned athletes on the planet — for ways to help you enhance your physical output. In this new FREE Guide from BlackBeltMag.com — The MMA Diet: How to Fuel Your Tank for Better Execution of MMA Techniques and Self-Defense Moves — full-time MMA conditioning and fighting coach Morné Swanepoel shows you:

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