samurai martial arts

Do you love samurai movies? Have you always been fascinated with samurai weapons? Do you want to learn but don’t know where to even begin? In his new FREE Guide — Samurai Weapons: Sword Master James Williams Shows You How to Start Training With Japanese Samurai Swords — sword master James Williams shares his experience and expert advice based on decades of practice and study in the field of samurai weapons. “There’s something about a sword — when you pick one up, you’re picking up more than just a piece of steel,” says sword master James Williams. “You’re accepting the responsibility to learn how to use it and the responsibility to learn how to protect and defend other people. You’re taking up a task that’s been passed down for millennia.” Get your copy of this FREE Guide — Samurai Weapons: Sword Master James Williams Shows You How to Start Training With Japanese Samurai Swords — and learn how Japanese samurai swords can give life as well as take it away. Samurai Weapons Are Dangerous in the Wrong Hands
“If you just want to chop things, there’s all kinds of ways you do it. But swords are dangerous,” sword master James Williams explains. “A big mistake can be life changing. I absolutely think you should get training first.” In this FREE Guide — Samurai Weapons: Sword Master James Williams Shows You How to Start Training With Japanese Samurai Swords — sword master James Williams explains safety protocols for beginners to prevent injuries. Qualified Instruction Is Essential for Safe Use of Japanese Samurai Swords Get your copy of this FREE Guide — Samurai Weapons: Sword Master James Williams Shows You How to Start Training With Japanese Samurai Swords — and learn the safety measures when you’ve got a live blade in your hand. “Your first time with a live blade should not be when you’re home alone,” advises sword master James Williams. “It should be when you’re with your instructor. He’ll show you what to do, and you should do just that.” Japanese Samurai Swords Are Not Just Sharp Blades — They Are Part of a Lifestyle Sword master James Williams says that the study of samurai weapons is not an isolated activity but rather an endeavor that permeates the practitioner’s lifestyle. “Don’t look at it like you’re going to get a belt rank — because you’re not,” he says. “It’s a broad study in which you’re walking the path of warriors, not tiptoeing around the edge of the meadow. It’s a connection to the past. It teaches you things about life that you can’t easily learn elsewhere.” Japanese Swords as a Combat Weapon Get your copy of this FREE Guide — Samurai Weapons: Sword Master James Williams Shows You How to Start Training With Japanese Samurai Swords — and learn how the sword was perceived as a killing tool and a life-giving instrument. Proper Use of the Sword
"A long time ago in Japan, they talked about 'the killing sword' and 'the life-giving sword," explains sword master James Williams. "One aspect of that is, the only way you can protect — the only way the sword can give life — is if you can kill. If you’re not capable of cutting down evil, you can’t protect anybody. The only proper use of the sword is to cut down evil to protect and defend. You can do all the pretty movements, but if you haven’t learned how to use it as a killing tool ..." Find out more about the importance of using Japanese samurai swords for their designed intent in James Williams' new Free Guide — Samurai Weapons: Sword Master James Williams Shows You How to Start Training With Japanese Samurai Swords.

SUBSCRIBE TO BLACKBELT MAGAZINE TODAY!
Don't miss a single issue of the world largest magazine of martial arts.
Black Belt magazine turned 50 this year. What became the world's leading martial arts magazine started in 1961 as a small black-and-white publication with a stapled spine. Today, Black Belt is a full-color magazine, an ever-expanding book library and an instructional-DVD archive -- and a website featuring hundreds of articles from the magazine's 50-year treasure trove of martial arts knowledge, hundreds of martial arts technique videos, video profiles of notable martial arts figures, interviews with martial arts luminaries, excerpts from exciting martial arts DVDs, and much more. To cap off 2011 -- and another year of progress in this new frontier of digital-media presentation -- the Black Belt editors took a look at blackbeltmag.com's cache of martial arts videos from "the year that was" and selected their favorites in a variety of categories.

BEST BRUCE LEE VIDEO

LINDA LEE CADWELL: THE ORIGINAL EDITION OF TAO OF JEET KUNE DO VS. THE NEW EXPANDED EDITION Bruce Lee's widow, Linda Lee Cadwell, talks With Black Belt about the history of her late husband's famous martial arts book Tao of Jeet Kune Do and the genesis of 2011's Tao of Jeet Kune Do: Expanded Edition.

BEST TRADITIONAL MARTIAL ARTS TECHNIQUE VIDEO

KAYLA HARRISON: JUDO'S OUCHI GARI (MAJOR INNER REAPING THROW) TECHNIQUE Judo expert Kayla Harrison brought home the United States’ fourth world-championship judo gold medal in September 2010. She was the first female American world judo champion in more than a quarter-century! In this video, she shows you a winning judo technique called ouchi gari.

BEST MARTIAL ARTS DVD TRAILER

KENJI YAMAKI: FULL-CONTACT KARATE! 2-DVD SET Kenji Yamaki survived Japan's 100-man karate combat challenge with a total of 83 wins! As production continues on his upcoming two-DVD set, Full-Contact Karate! — Advanced Sparring Techniques / Hard-Core Physical Conditioning, Black Belt proudly presents this exciting preview montage!

BEST SAMURAI VIDEO

SAMURAI SWORD CUTTING WITH MASAYUKI SHIMABUKURO! Samurai sword masters Masayuki Shimabukuro and Carl E. Long detail and demonstrate a variety of samurai sword techniques in this exclusive DVD preview from their 2011 DVD release Advanced Samurai Swordsmanship. In introducing Shimabukuro’s cutting demonstration, or suemono giri, Long explains: “We’re going to explore the more advanced section of test-cutting. The first one we’re going to do is called inazuma. Inazuma means ‘lightning strike,’ and so it’s key that the cuts never truly stop moving." And it's plain to see what he means as samurai sword master Shimabukuro quickly, elegantly and seemingly effortlessly slices a rolled tatami to pieces.

TELL US YOUR FAVORITE VIDEOS! Do you have favorite martial arts videos that we didn't select? Let us know! Contact our website directly, and post your suggestions to Black Belt's Facebook page!

Keep Reading Show less
Free Bruce Lee Guide
Have you ever wondered how Bruce Lee’s boxing influenced his jeet kune do techniques? Read all about it in this free guide.
Don’t miss a thing Subscribe to Our Newsletter