samurai

To Master the Supreme Philosophy of Enshin Karate, Look to Musashi's Book of Five Rings for Guidance!

In the martial arts, we voluntarily subject ourselves to conflict in a training environment so we can transcend conflict in the real world. After all, we wouldn't knowingly train in a style that makes us weaker or worsens our position. The irony of all this is that we don't want to fight our opponent. We prefer to work with what an opponent gives us to turn the tide in our favor, to resolve the situation effectively and efficiently.The Japanese have a word for this: sabaki. It means to work with energy efficiently. When we train with the sabaki mindset, we receive our opponent's attack, almost as a gift. Doing so requires less physical effort and frees up our mental operating system so it can determine the most efficient solution to the conflict.In this essay, I will present a brief history of sabaki, as well as break down the sabaki method using Miyamoto Musashi's five elements

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Yes, the title is a pun.

I like movies; I like samurai; I made a Facebook poll to see which samurai movies my fellow martial artists would recommend! If you're looking for something good to watch, why not check out one of these films?

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This is the final edition of an epic five-part series that details the beginning of world-renowned swordsman Dana Abbott's training.

The everyday practice and study of kendo in a climate where the temperature reaches and exceeds 90 degrees plus applicable humidity is stifling. Japanese call this "mushi atsui", but in New York City it is just known as "muggy". Hot thick air makes the practice of any sport difficult and energy zapping. Just imagine you are in heavy cumbersome kendo gear combined with this weather. After a few hundred strikes into a workout one's lethargic body becomes immune to its surroundings and that "can't get started" feeling is diminished. Soaking wet kendo gear combined with the stench of hundreds of students doing the same thing creates a thick pungent layer of air that you could literally cut with a sword.

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This is the fourth edition of an epic five-part series that details the beginning of world-renowned swordsman Dana Abbott's training.

Over the course of my daily studies I was already warmed up and feeling pretty good about myself with a good mindset. Kinda like a cat waiting to pounce on a mouse. As I slowly step inwards, I eye my adversary. I seek an opening and begin my frontal attack. Then "crack" I get whacked with a deafening blow to the top of my head from my opponent's bamboo shinai, which really promoted my awareness. As Shizawa sensei repeatedly said, "don't blink your eyes...because it does not hurt any less".

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This is the third edition of an epic five-part series that details the beginning of world-renowned swordsman Dana Abbott's training.

During the course of my studies at Nihon Taiiku Daikgaku I discovered I had become a productive member of their society based on their standards. Not because I worked or paid taxes. It was because I was learning kendo. In Japanese culture anyone who learns and performs kendo keeps the spirit of the samurai alive and is a very positive role model for generations to come.

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