ninjutsu

Tree climbing and throwing stars aside, ninjutsu encompasses principles of psychological self-defense that even the military use. Such valuable skills are readily available to you, too. Start changing your design for living right here!

Centuries ago, the art of ninjutsu was born into a world enveloped in war. That one fact makes it vastly different from styles like aikido and Brazilian jiu-jitsu, which were founded during peacetime. Because of its violent childhood, ninjutsu matured into a system that focused on fighting methods that worked on the battlefield, behind enemy lines and against multiple attackers. The art grew to encompass principles for psychological self-defense that enabled its adherents to live out their lives on their own terms, free from fear. Those same principles are now used by military personnel around the world — even though they probably don't know where the teachings came from. Because we all face adversity — granted, it may not be as severe as that experienced by a black-clad warrior 500 years ago or an Army Ranger today — ninja wisdom is just as valuable in the 21st century as it ever was.

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How DOES jolly ol' St. Nick get in and out of your house without tripping alarms, waking dogs or being seen by late-night passersby? Our theory: Santa Claus is a ninja master. You be the judge.

The ninja called it ongyo-jutsu, the art of escape. It gave them an unrivaled command of trickery and stealth and earned them a reputation for being superhuman. They were said to be able to disappear through walls, turn themselves into trees or rocks, and even live underwater like a fish — all of which offers undeniable proof that the martial art that enables Santa Claus to do his thing on Christmas Eve is  ninjutsu

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Ninjutsu was born into a world enveloped in war. Because of its violent childhood, ninjutsu techniques focused on methods that worked in the worst situations. Learn how YOU can apply them to your martial arts training!

Centuries ago, ninjutsu was born into a world enveloped in war. That one fact makes it vastly different from styles like aikido and Brazilian jiu-jitsu, which were founded during peacetime. Because of its violent childhood, ninjutsu techniques focused on fighting methods that worked on the battlefield, behind enemy lines and against multiple attackers. The art grew to encompass principles for psychological self-defense that enabled its adherents to live out their lives on their own terms, free from fear.

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The March 2013 issue of Black Belt officially goes on sale today. The following is a rundown of the features and columns you’ll find inside.

The March 2013 issue of Black Belt officially goes on sale today. The following is a rundown of the features and columns you’ll find inside. COVER STORY: SIMPLICITY IN SELF-DEFENSE From this single, nontelegraphic defensive posture, a martial artist can counter the most common street attacks. Chief master G.K. Lee of the American Taekwondo Association explains.

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Welcome to Ninja History 101. During today's lesson, we'll be examining Spies and Assassins, Ninja Gear, Ninjutsu Weapons and Ninjutsu Training. But first, a brief introduction. Ninjutsu practitioners were called ninja, and they underwent rigorous ninjutsu training to become undercover agents of the powerful lords of feudal Japan.

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Have you ever wondered how Bruce Lee’s boxing influenced his jeet kune do techniques? Read all about it in this free guide.
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