martial arts tournament

Over the last decade, it has been drilled into my head and many other officials not to give advice to competitors on what we may have deducted for in their form. "Give your score and nothing more" is a phrase that you will commonly hear from officials when talking about whether to give critiques to competitors afterward. To be honest, I have had to develop a standard line of something like, "I thought you looked great today… That sure was a tough division you were in." The premise is that it should be the coaches or instructors' job to correct any problems or mistakes in the competitor's technique.
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As I get ready to board a plane for the Amerikick Internationals I admit I am both nervous and excited to be going to a large tournament for the first time in almost two years. The nervousness comes from not only the new strains of Covid-19 and being around large groups of people, but also the fact that I haven't been able to judge at as many events over the last two years as normal. Fighters refer to it as ring rust, but its not just the competitors that have to shake it off but the officials too.
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No matter what system or style you have practiced over the years, you have at some time or another probably been exposed to some level of competition. Maybe it was just an inner school tournament, or it could have been traveling the world for competition, but at some point you have probably felt the butterflies that everyone gets from testing yourself against others. My question is why do you do it?
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