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MMA fighter and Texas National Guard Staff Sgt. Tim Kennedy explains how to use Army combatives' "close and destroy" moves against an opponent in this technique video shot exclusively for Black Belt magazine!

Are you looking for H2HC (hand-to-hand combat) training? Well, we've got the military martial arts expert you're looking for — and, to boot, he's also an MMA fighter! We're talking, of course, about UFC fighter Tim Kennedy. This mixed martial artist — who's competed in Strikeforce, the WEC, the IFC, ShoMMA, HDNet Fights, and represented the Chicago Red Bears in the IFL — is a staff sergeant in the Texas National Guard. Tim Kennedy is an H2HC expert and an expert in Army Rangers training, and he is trained in the self-defense moves of the Modern Army Combatives Program (MACP) and the Special Operations Combatives Program (SOCP).

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The man who brought CQC into the 21st century talks with Black Belt magazine about how MACP came to be and why it's the future of military combatives for troops on the ground.

Back in 1983, I heeded the call of Uncle Sam and joined the U.S. Army. Basic training at Fort Bliss, Texas, was easy enough and mostly fun, what with the M16 rifles, M60 machine guns, hand grenades, Claymore mines and LAWs (light anti-tank weapons). A martial artist interested in state-of-the-art weaponry couldn't ask for more. One thing I was disappointed about, however, was the hand-to-hand combat (H2HC) training — or the lack thereof. We spent a few hours with bayonets mounted on our M16s, running through slash-thrust-butt-stroke drills without a target, and that was it. Essentially, we did a bit of kata with no bunkai and definitely no kumite.Preparation for empty-hand combat was nonexistent. Fast-forward to 2003. The Army has radically changed its training philosophy, and recruits are required to cycle through the MACP, or Modern Army Combatives Program

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Mixed martial arts and military training are great ways to get tough -- and few demonstrate that better than Tim Kennedy, who brings his wide range of hand-to-hand combat experience to bear in this video!

In the March 2012 issue of Black Belt, Executive Editor Robert W. Young named MMA fighter Tim Kennedy the Most Dangerous Man in the World — and with good reason, given his at-that-time 14-3 (and now 16-3) MMA record driven by extensive training in karate, kickboxing, wrestling and jiu-jitsu. However, as Young pointed out in his editorial, it’s Tim Kennedy’s extensive H2HC training and experience that truly make him the Most Dangerous Man in the World. Tim Kennedy's H2HC experience includes Army Basic Training, Airborne School, the Special Forces Qualification Course, serving on a counterterrorism unit in Iraq, Army Rangers Training, serving as a combatives instructor for the 7th Special Forces Group, plus completing the Modern Army Combatives Program (MACP) and the Special Operations Combative Program (SOCP). In addition to being a mixed martial arts fighter, this H2HC instructor is a staff sergeant in the Texas National Guard. In this exclusive video, H2HC expert Tim Kennedy demonstrates self-defense moves he acquired in Army Rangers Training and the Special Operations Combatives Program. Although he is wearing military gear, the H2HC concepts and basic self-defense moves are applicable to attacks in civilian life.

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Modern Army Combatives Program (MACP) creator Matt Larsen and Black Belt Executive Editor Robert W. Young discuss the logistics and considerations of civilians carrying concealed weapons such as firearms and pocket knives in hand-to-hand combat.