kick

From the pages of Bruce Lee's Fighting Method: The Complete Edition, the martial arts icon is shown executing this martial arts staple in a self-defense situation on the street!

When you study violent encounters, one fact tends to stand out time and again: The prepared fighter almost always wins. But being prepared requires more than just training. Long before self-defense experts and military analysts adopted the phrase "situational awareness," Bruce Lee taught us that we must always be aware of our surroundings. Or as Lee would say, "The best surprise against a surprise attack is not to be surprised."

Keep Reading Show less

Jeet kune do authority Taky Kimura once described Kelly S. Worden as an “American icon of the progressive arts.” In this exclusive interview, Worden reveals how his mentors helped him synthesize arnis, JKD and other concepts to forge a system he calls “renegade JKD."

Jeet kune do authority Taky Kimura once described Kelly S. Worden as an “American icon of the progressive arts.” For more than 35 years, Kelly Worden has devoted his waking hours to blending and integrating a multitude of martial arts concepts to form a system of cross-training he calls Natural Spirit International. In this exclusive interview with Black Belt magazine, the University Place, Washington-based master reveals how his teachers and mentors helped him forge a system he calls “renegade JKD,” his unique path to martial arts self-discovery.

Black Belt: You started in boxing and catch wrestling before moving to isshin-ryu karate, but from the beginning, your focus has been on fighting. When did you find out your path was different from that of other traditional practitioners?

Kelly Worden: Almost immediately. I was undisciplined. There were six children in our family. My father was a disabled veteran from World War II, and much of his time was spent in a veteran’s hospital. I found myself running the streets early on and getting into a lot of fights. I enjoyed fighting, but that attitude created other problems and issues, and I left home when I was 15. Traditional isshin-ryu karate tempered my spirit and offered structured learning and self-discipline. At best, I was an aggressive, mediocre karate practitioner, but I persevered by training in different arts. Fighting was always the core of [my] approach.

Learn how the boxing techniques of Muhammad Ali and Joe Louis influenced
Bruce Lee’s development of jeet kune do techniques in this FREE download!
Bruce Lee Training Research: How Boxing Influenced His Jeet Kune Do Techniques

Keep Reading Show less

When some people think about the concept of impact, they imagine a punch sending someone through a wall -- but it can be something as simple as a pressure-point attack. Watch Avi Nardia explain how he teaches this quick and quiet takedown method.

In the Israeli martial arts, kapap defines “impact” as a force or shock that strikes a target. While this may seem like a simple statement for a powerful force, it remains an apt definition because it is all-inclusive. Rather than define impact as a kick or punch, Israeli martial arts practitioners using kapap techniques define impact as any force that can be applied by anything. This not only includes kicks and strikes but also defensive impacts, like blocks, or offensive impacts made by weapons, such as guns, sticks and knives.

Keep Reading Show less

When you move inside kicking range and punching range, you enter trapping range. There, attacking arms get deflected and immobilized; and knees, elbows and head butts cut loose. Learn how Jang Mu Won Hapkido handles close-range combat.

When you move inside kicking range and punching range, you enter trapping range. There, attacking arms get deflected and immobilized; and knees, elbows and head butts cut loose. Hapkido teaches a variety of hand techniques for trapping range, says Jeffrey D. Harris of Jang Mu Won Hapkido, the international organization founded by Black Belt Hall of Fame member Chong S. Kim. “When your opponent grabs you, you trap him with his own arms as you move in to twist and throw. We cover that extensively,” he says. Stephen Petermann, also of Jang Mu Won Hapkido, describes the art’s simple trapping philosophy: “It’s OK to just trap his hands so he can’t smack you, but it’s better to get them out of the way so you can smack him. One of my favorite techniques is to trap the guy’s arms, then kick him in the face with an outside crescent kick.” Against Weapons Traditional hapkido knife defense falls into this range because the attacker’s knife-wielding arm often gets trapped before the weapon is taken away or directed back toward him. “The general way is to control the limb with the weapon using a trapping technique, joint manipulation or pressure-point strike,” Jeffrey D. Harris says.

Keep Reading Show less