kayla harrison

Thursday night's Professional Fighters League show from Atlantic City was a mixed bag of results as Olympic champion and defending PFL titleholder Kayla Harrison made quick work of her opponent while former UFC heavyweight champion Fabricio Werdum suffered a controversial loss in his PFL debut. The two-time judo gold medalist did what she does in her women's lightweight bout getting a quick takedown against Mariana Morais, moving into mount and unleashing punches until the referee stopped the fight a minute and a half in.

Werdum looked on a similar trajectory against heavyweight foe Renan Ferreira gaining the early takedown and slowly advancing position. But as he attempted to pass from half-guard into mount, Ferreira reversed him, though Werdum was able to slip into a triangle choke from the bottom appearing to make Ferreira tap. Referee Keith Peterson failed to see it, however.

Werdum later claimed he stopped because he felt the tap but he didn't release his hold (interview below) and with no signal from the referee, Ferreira continued punching and hammerfisting the former UFC titlist. As Werdum seemed to go limp from the blows, Peterson finally stopped the bout awarding it to Ferreira.

Fabricio Werdum Post Fight Interview | PFL 3, 2021

Fabricio Werdum checks in with Sean O'Connell following the PFL 3 controversial no-call on the tap!

The Professional Fighters League continues to release roster information for their upcoming 2021 season naming their men's heavyweight and women's lightweight divisions on Tuesday. The heavyweight division will see the return of unbeaten defending champion Ali Isaev. It will also feature newcomer, and former UFC heavyweight titlist, Fabricio Werdum.

The women's lightweight division will see the return of the PFL's most recognizable champion. After dropping down to featherweight to take a fight for the Invicta promotion last November, two-time Olympic judo gold medalist Kayla Harrison goes back to 155 pounds to defend her 2019 PFL lightweight championship. The two divisions are scheduled to debut May 6.


BLACK BELT: Going into the judo competition at the 2012 Olympic Games, were you confident? Had you visualized yourself winning the gold?

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— Editors

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