judo

Portugal's Jorge Fonseca showed an explosive brand of judo in claiming his second straight 100 kg gold medal at the World Judo Championships, Friday. Fonseca scored a half point on a throw in the finals against Serbia's Aleksandar Kukolj, then came back to score a full ippon a minute later with an inside trip. Kukolj entered the day needing to make it all the way to the finals to qualify for the Olympics. Though he had to settle for the silver medal here, he at least punched his ticket to the upcoming Tokyo Games.

In the women's half of the tournament, Germany's Anna-Maria Wagner needed to go to overtime to defeat defending champion Madeleine Malonga of France for the 78 kg title, scoring with an inside leg reap to claim the championship.

Following the George Floyd tragedy last year upon viewing the video from the perspective of a seasoned judoka, it was obvious that Derek Chauvin had his knee place perfectly on Floyd's carotid artery. I knew instinctively that holding that position for a prolonged length of time would cause certain death. I thought to myself how all police need to be judo black belts just like in Japan. As judo is the perfect martial art for the police work from both a technical as well as philosophical perspective.

Keep Reading Show less

To no one's surprise, Japan added to their medal total at the World Judo Championships capturing gold in the mixed team event on the final day of competition from Budapest, Hungary. After dominating the individual portion of the tournament grabbing more gold and more total medals than any other nation, Japan crushed France in the finals to claim the title in the six-person team event.

Japan swept the first four matches of the finals and didn't even need heavyweight world champion Kokoro Kageura to bother taking the mat for the fifth match. Overall, Japan came away from the world championships with six golds - no other country got more than one - and twelve total medals. The Netherlands was a distant second in the overall medal count with five, all bronze.


On the final day of individual competition at the World Judo Championships in Budapest, Hungary, Japan closed in style winning both the men's and women's heavyweight divisions. Kokoro Kageura scored a half point with a shoulder throw and then survived a last second frenzied ground attack by Russia's Tamerlan Bashaev to take the men's gold.

The women's side saw an all Japanese final as Sarah Asahina won her second individual adult world championship over Wakaba Tomita in a slow-paced affair. Tomita had trouble dealing with the much larger Asahina but, despite several leg sweeps, Asahina was never able to score with anything decisive. After more than five minutes of overtime, though she appeared to be the more active competitor, Tomita received a third penalty for passivity giving the match to Asahina. Tomita injured her leg on the final exchange and in a display of sportsmanship, Asahina carried her teammate off the mat on her back.