hook punch

If you trained under a boxing coach, this is how you'd learn to execute the lead hook and the rear uppercut. When you're done reading, click the link to examine the lead jab and the rear cross!

Punch No. 3: Lead Hook The boxing lead hook is a more or less rounded punch made with the leading hand. It whips around to the side of the opponent’s face or midsection, then snaps back. The hook draws power from translation, but this takes place in a manner unlike the jab or cross. Because the punch hits sideways, translation in the hook occurs when the bodyweight shifts from the side of the leading leg to the side of the rear leg. Power is added as the hips and shoulders rotate in the direction of the blow.

Lead hook to the chin

Keep Reading Show less
SUBSCRIBE TO BLACKBELT MAGAZINE TODAY!
Don't miss a single issue of the world largest magazine of martial arts.

Who better to turn to than Ted Wong -- the man who many claim was Bruce Lee's No. 1 disciple -- for advice on fixing the mistakes students make in their jeet kune do techniques?

Like the people who run most magazines, we at Black Belt love to look at surveys — in particular, surveys that tell us what you want to read. Back in the 1970s, those surveys told us you were interested in kung fu self-defense moves and jeet kune do moves. In the ’80s, it was taekwondo techniques, ninjutsu techniques and jeet kune do techniques. In the ’90s, it was kenpo, Brazilian jiu-jitsu and jeet kune do. In the 2000s, it’s been the mixed martial arts and — you guessed it — jeet kune do. To serve up an article about the one fighting art that has remained on everyone’s radar ever since Bruce Lee began showcasing it in movies, we talked with Ted Wong, the man many claim was Bruce Lee’s No. 1 disciple. In 2006, Ted Wong was inducted into the Black Belt Hall of Fame as Man of the Year for his ongoing efforts to propagate JKD around the world. Who better to turn to for advice on fixing the mistakes students make in their jeet kune do techniques? Sadly, Ted Wong passed away on November 24, 2010. Before his passing, however, he shared with us the 14 mistakes he encountered most often and offered advice from his decades of experience.

Keep Reading Show less

In this excerpt from Kenji Yamaki's Full-Contact Karate: Advanced Sparring Techniques and Hard-Core Physical Conditioning 2-DVD set, the 100-man-kumite survivor shows you two counters for the one-two punch.

Now available from Black Belt Magazine Video is the two-DVD karate set from kyokushintechniques master Kenji Yamaki! Titled Full-Contact Karate: Advanced Sparring Techniques and Hard-Core Physical Conditioning, this exciting collection demonstrates karate moves that Kenji Yamaki often teaches his advanced students. Kenji Yamaki was one of the top kyokushin karate competitors in Japan. Upon immigrating to the United States and setting up shop at Yamaki Karate in Torrance, California, Kenji Yamaki began teaching his own style of hard-core karate, which he dubbed yamaki-ryu. Having trained extensively in a system made famous by Masutatsu Oyama’s intense striking techniques, Kenji Yamaki's style favors kyokushin techniques laced with kicks that are frighteningly powerful and lightning fast.

Keep Reading Show less

Many of the worst injuries from street violence don’t result from the punch that knocks someone out; they result from the head hitting the ground when the person falls. A 6-foot-tall man’s head drops six feet to the asphalt, perhaps smacking a car, a curb or a trash can along the way. Ugh. Here are a few street-fighting tips that will prevent that from happening to you:

Keep Reading Show less

The call came while I was out. When I got home, my wife said someone had phoned from China. They wanted me to teach a martial arts seminar. At first, I didn't believe her. Then an e-mail came from Xiaoxiang Vocational School, which was trying to establish a jeet kune do curriculum. Access to Bruce Lee's art in China was limited, but he remains popular there, with statues being erected and a nightly TV show called The Legend of Bruce Lee. I didn't reply right away; instead, I forwarded the message to my sifu,Ted Wong. Another call came — it was Julie, a translator for the school. She asked if I'd travel to Hunan province at their expense to train and possibly certify a group of hand-picked martial artists. Questions flooded my mind. How long would it take? What would the culture be like? Could I even use chopsticks? More e-mails and calls … they wanted me for three months. My opening bid was one month, and we settled on two. I decided that because people were calling me from the other side of the planet, I'd surrender my day job and focus on my passion, the martial arts. I packed one carry-on, forgot about buying a Minnesota fishing license, kissed the wife goodbye and hopped on a plane.

Keep Reading Show less
Free Bruce Lee Guide
Have you ever wondered how Bruce Lee’s boxing influenced his jeet kune do techniques? Read all about it in this free guide.
Don’t miss a thing Subscribe to Our Newsletter