hook

If you trained under a boxing coach, this is how you'd learn to execute the lead hook and the rear uppercut. When you're done reading, click the link to examine the lead jab and the rear cross!

Punch No. 3: Lead Hook The boxing lead hook is a more or less rounded punch made with the leading hand. It whips around to the side of the opponent’s face or midsection, then snaps back. The hook draws power from translation, but this takes place in a manner unlike the jab or cross. Because the punch hits sideways, translation in the hook occurs when the bodyweight shifts from the side of the leading leg to the side of the rear leg. Power is added as the hips and shoulders rotate in the direction of the blow.

Lead hook to the chin

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From the pages of Bruce Lee's Fighting Method: The Complete Edition, the martial arts icon is shown executing this martial arts staple in a self-defense situation on the street!

When you study violent encounters, one fact tends to stand out time and again: The prepared fighter almost always wins. But being prepared requires more than just training. Long before self-defense experts and military analysts adopted the phrase "situational awareness," Bruce Lee taught us that we must always be aware of our surroundings. Or as Lee would say, "The best surprise against a surprise attack is not to be surprised."

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Who better to turn to than Ted Wong -- the man who many claim was Bruce Lee's No. 1 disciple -- for advice on fixing the mistakes students make in their jeet kune do techniques?

Like the people who run most magazines, we at Black Belt love to look at surveys — in particular, surveys that tell us what you want to read. Back in the 1970s, those surveys told us you were interested in kung fu self-defense moves and jeet kune do moves. In the ’80s, it was taekwondo techniques, ninjutsu techniques and jeet kune do techniques. In the ’90s, it was kenpo, Brazilian jiu-jitsu and jeet kune do. In the 2000s, it’s been the mixed martial arts and — you guessed it — jeet kune do. To serve up an article about the one fighting art that has remained on everyone’s radar ever since Bruce Lee began showcasing it in movies, we talked with Ted Wong, the man many claim was Bruce Lee’s No. 1 disciple. In 2006, Ted Wong was inducted into the Black Belt Hall of Fame as Man of the Year for his ongoing efforts to propagate JKD around the world. Who better to turn to for advice on fixing the mistakes students make in their jeet kune do techniques? Sadly, Ted Wong passed away on November 24, 2010. Before his passing, however, he shared with us the 14 mistakes he encountered most often and offered advice from his decades of experience.

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Until the 1960s, judoka didn’t think much about gripping skills. Then the former USSR judo team entered the Olympics and brought sambo-wrestling grips into the tournament. The team's many victories because of the grips stunned the judo competition world. Today, gripping skills are considered important in the world of judo info, and this is especially true at higher levels of judo competition. How the First Grip Tips the Scale in Judo Techniques One of the most common pieces of judo info that students learn in beginning judo is to get the first grip possible. In advanced judo, getting the first grip becomes more difficult to accomplish because it gives the gripper a decided advantage. The first person to grip is the competitor who gets to dictate the direction of play. If you grip first, then the opponent has to react. You pull, he will pull. The first grip is like playing “King of the Mountain.” The first to the top is better able to maintain that top position. The thing to remember about the first grip is that, in many ways, we’re referring to the first good grip or dominant grip that allows a competitor a better position in which to attack. So this means that the first grip isn’t necessarily the “first grip” of the entire match. It is the first grip in the current tussle that you find yourself in with your opponent.

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