george dillman

A former tournament standout, George Dillman first learned of the role pressure points play in self-defense from Hohan Soken. Subsequent training under Seiyu Oyata opened Dillman's eyes to the effectiveness of the art, which is known as kyusho-jitsu.

By anyone's standard, pressure-point expert George Dillman has an impressive martial arts résumé. As an instructor, he's made incredible strides in expanding his students' knowledge of pressure points. In his desire to make a mark on the martial arts world, he's succeeded in branding the community with an effective, and sometimes controversial, weapon that any martial artist can use.

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In Part 2 of a profile published just three years before the stick-combat legend's death, author Jeffrey J. Delaney recalls the achievements and teaching style of modern arnis founder Remy Presas.

Editor's Note: This article was originally published as "Remy Presas, Founder of Modern Arnis: Pioneer of the Philippine Arts Is Still Polishing and Spreading His System" in the August 1998 issue of Black Belt — prior to Remy Presas' passing in 2001. To preserve the article's tone and historical context, the time references have been left intact. Read Part 1 of this profile here.

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In the martial arts community, those who practice kyusho-jitsu (pressure-point fighting) are often subjected to criticism. It all started when their self-defense moves were first brought into the limelight and onlookers didn't even want to believe the techniques were real. Those days are long past, however, and the reality of knockouts resulting from usage of human pressure points has been convincingly demonstrated time and time again — most notably by Black Belt Hall of Fame member (and kyusho-jitsu expert) George Dillman and his students. Nowadays, two main criticisms of kyusho-jitsu persist. The first consists of dire warnings that self-defense moves using pressure-point techniques are dangerous and that those who practice them by actually knocking each other out are reckless and foolhardy. This accusation was later found to be groundless.

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Throughout the decades, Leo Fong has worn many hats—actor, writer, director, producer, minister, social worker and fitness coach—but his most important role has been that of kung fu master. Born in Guangzhou (formerly Canton), China, Leo Fong moved to Arkansas at age 4. In his youth, he used his pugilistic skills to become an Amateur Athletic Union and Golden Gloves champion in Arkansas and Texas. He then enrolled at Hendrix College in Arkansas and later received a master’s degree in theology from Southern Methodist University. After beginning his career as a Methodist minister, he earned a master’s degree in social work from Sacramento State University. Leo Fong moved to Northern California, where he began training in a variety of martial arts. He attained master-level rank in taekwondo, jujutsu, si lum kung fu, choy lay fut and wing chun kung fu. He had the good fortune to train with three legends: choy lay fut’s Lau Bun, sil lum’s T.Y. Wong and then-wing chun practitioner Bruce Lee. Leo Fong often receives credit for inspiring Bruce Lee to develop his boxing skills and for helping him formulate jeet kune do.

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