french foot fighting

In Part 2 of this classic Black Belt article from 1967, the founder of the French Federation of Karate and Associated Disciplines describes the techniques, training, power-generation methods, rank structure and competition rules used in savate.

In Part 2 of this classic Black Belt article from 1967, J. Delcourt, founder of the French Federation of Karate and Associated Disciplines, describes the techniques, training, power-generation methods, rank structure and competition rules used in the French fighting art of savate. “French boxing is a kind of fencing, but with the feet and fists,” says one savate expert. “It aims to develop the beauty of the style and of the gesture, the aesthetics of the movements, and the pleasure of practicing a manly sport.” And like karate, the avowed aims of the masters of the art are to also develop the physical and spiritual qualities of man. There are several other similarities to karate. For instance, outdoor training is very popular with savate enthusiasts. They like to run through the woods, especially through bushes and thorns, to practice lifting their legs high. French boxing is practiced amid an atmosphere of aristocracy and good manners, and with a chivalrous spirit as the aim. With those ideals, the French savate practitioner, like his counterpart in the Japanese martial arts, doesn’t emphasize the physical at the expense of other aspects. The practice of the art is the important thing, not just the pure physical perfection of it. Techniques Savate in recent years has continued to develop. Fist techniques have been introduced more and more of late. The classical posture used to be stiff and static, but now movements are becoming more fluid thanks to the introduction of English boxing techniques.

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