fighting techniques

Black Belt Hall of Famer Jim Arvanitis weighs in on the subject of pankration and the Olympics, while Black Belt contributing editor Mark Hatmaker looks at the evolution of wrestling and the Games.

In Part 1 of this series, Black Belt examined judo and how it's changed because of the Olympics. In Part 2, we looked at taekwondo and the effect the Games have had on the Korean martial art. In Part 3, the subject was the Olympics and karate — which, it was recently confirmed, will debut at the 2020 Games. Here, we discuss how wrestling has been altered and whether pankration has a chance of getting back in.

— Editors

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Black Belt's Asia correspondent tries his hand at san da while studying at Shanghai University of Sport. See the "Brooklyn monk" in action!

“Strictly speaking, san da is a Chinese martial arts amalgam composed of kickboxing and wrestling-style takedowns,” Antonio Graceffo says. “Some writers have referred to san da as ‘Chinese MMA,’ but that’s inaccurate because it normally doesn’t include ground fighting or submissions. Furthermore, in competition, san da fighters are permitted to clinch, but they’re not allowed to hit while doing so.

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Seventh-degree tang soo do black belt Dominick A. Giacobbe takes you on a journey through the art's history and demonstrates four techniques!

Seventh-degree black belt Dominick A. Giacobbe knows a little something about free fighting. The owner and chief instructor of the Tang Soo Karate Academy in Pine Hill, New Jersey, has trained in the Korean art of tang soo do for more than four decades. During that time, he's educated more than 1,000 black belts and 40-plus masters, all while finding time to further his own training under some of the finest experts in America, Korea and Japan. Among them are the renowned J.C. Shin and Black Belt Hall of Fame member C.S. Kim (1995 Man of the Year)

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"One of the toughest things you're going to run into is going empty-hand against a knife," knife-fighting and H2HC expert Michael Janich says in this exclusive video showing you how to handle such a high-risk situation.

With more than 30 years of martial arts and H2HC experience, Michael Janich is widely recognized as one of America's top knife-fighting experts, authorities on edged-weapon design and instructors of self-defense moves. Michael Janich was inducted into the Black Belt Hall of Fame as the 2010 Weapons Instructor of the Year. "One of the toughest things you're going to run into is going empty-hand against a knife," knife-fighting and H2HC expert Michael Janich says. "It's one of the scariest situations you can possibly imagine. And of the different situations you could be in, one of the most committed attacks and one of the most common attacks is [an attacker] thrusting straight at [you].

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