ed parker

Chuck Norris, Fumio Demura and Ed Parker Sound Off on Problems and Solutions

BLACK BELT: With the growth of interest in competition, there has been a lot of criticism about how tournaments are set up. What are the basic problems?

Parker: Uppermost is the fact that there are no uniform rules from one tourney to another. This is really a problem — a man could win in one tournament through one way and lose out in another.

Norris: It's getting better, but it needs improvement.

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Every year in Long Beach, California, a huge karate tournament takes place. Since 1964 this tournament, the prestigious International Karate Championships, has been a proving ground for superstars like Bruce Lee, Chuck Norris, Joe Lewis and Mike Stone. Even today, celebrities such as Bill Wallace, Jeff Speakman, Gene LeBell and Eric Lee make appearances there to sign autographs and speak to fans.

What many newcomers — and even veterans — to this tournament are unaware of is the rich history and tradition of the illustrious event. The man behind it all, Edmund K. Parker, left it as part of his legacy. His death in December 1990 stunned the martial arts world, but the tournament, and so much more of Parker's work, is being carried on.

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The legendary Ed Parker, father of American kenpo, describes the different types of speed that martial artists needs to know.

To understand karate techniques and how they function, you must have knowledge of physics. You must study the body and learn how the senses — through the principles of mass, speed, body alignment, angles, momentum, gravitational marriage, torque, focus, stability, power and penetration — can make the body function intuitively. An in-depth study of these principles of physics will also reveal the sophistication contained within basic techniques.

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His career encompasses adversity, moviemaking, politics and Russia. Find out a few of the ways Jhoon Rhee has helped shape taekwondo around the world.

“A picture is worth 1,000 words; an action is worth 1,000 pictures." — Jhoon Rhee

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