combative

Moni Aizik Teaches "The Wiz" Weapon Disarm

Moni Aizik began training in judo, boxing and jujutsu at age 8, and won national titles in judo seven times. As an adult, he helped train the Israeli Army, improving their hand-to-hand combat systems.

In the 1980s, Aizik moved from his home country, Israel, to Canada, where he began teaching Krav Maga. In 2004, he released Commando Krav Maga. This program is designed to allow civilians of all walks of life to defend themselves from threats.

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Michael Janich, John Riddle, Kelly McCann, Mike Gillette and Tom Gresham — each an expert in one or more aspects of self-defense — answer questions about guns, knives and terrorism.

Question 7: Do you recommend that people who are concerned about defending themselves in situations like the ones we're discussing consider lawfully carrying a firearm — assuming they have an interest and have had the proper training? Mike Gillette: They should consider it, but there are many layers to this issue, everything from what the prevailing laws are that govern the use of force when protecting yourself to how to store the weapon safely in your home. The responsibilities of owning and carrying a firearm are considerable. And once you’ve sorted out the logistical aspects of carrying a firearm, you still have to be able to competently handle that firearm. And that takes the right training — to develop the physical skills and decision-making ability. Although it may sound counterintuitive, self-defense, whether armed or unarmed, is very much a thinking person’s game.

Photo Courtesy of Mike Gillette

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Just because you learned a technique in the dojo doesn't mean you'll always be able to access it in a fight. This veteran combatives instructor is here to help you solve the problem.

It’s important to distinguish between remembering a technique and maintaining one in a reliable-under-duress state so you won’t fail in a violent incident. That distinction is important because when you’ve been startled by an attack, the subsequent physiological response has a diminishing effect on several things: speed of response, effective recall, physical skill, decision making and more. Although learning hundreds of techniques may be a great hobby and a method to demonstrate skill progression and achieve rank, it won’t help your ability to immediately respond to an unexpected attack. Hick’s Law, if you’re unfamiliar with it, describes choice-reaction time — basically, it holds that the speed with which a person responds is adversely affected by the number of choices available. Having fewer choices results in faster response time. Physical skills meant to be reliable and useful under duress require maintenance in order to leverage the recency effect, or the tendency to remember and perform skills that were/are recently and frequently practiced. Although people may remember and demonstrate 250 techniques over time in a nonthreatening and passive environment, how many could they sort through, select and execute when their life is threatened?

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Self-defense expert Richard Ryan gives Black Belt magazine a four-minute mini-seminar on how speed-hand striking can help women escape close-quarters attacks in this exclusive video!


As one of the nation's leading authorities on self-protection and tactical weapons training, Richard Ryan is a longtime advocate of the scientific approach to self-defense. Richard Ryan is the founder of the Dynamic Combat Method and the co-founder of iCAT (Integrated Combative Arts Training) with Joe Lewis and Walt Lysak Jr. In this nearly four-minute mini-seminar video, the reality-based martial arts expert discusses the palm vs. the fist, using speed to one's advantage and how to open up the chance to escalate a conflict or escape an attacker.

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