close quarter combat

You have a gun. They have a knife. How do you handle this situation? Close-quarters-combat expert Rob Pincus shows you in this exclusive self-defense video!

Rob Pincus is an internationally known firearms trainer who teaches both end-user and instructor-development self-defense courses. In this exclusive self-defense video, this close-quarters-combat expert shows you how to use a technique called "duck under to side control" in a situation when you have a handgun and an attacker with a knife threatens your safety

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In the martial arts, one school of thought holds that you should change your game to match your opponent's. Example: If you're a stand-up fighter and you're facing a grappler, you should immediately switch into grappling mode. Problem is, that requires you to train to such an extent that each subset of your skills is superior to the skills of a person who focuses on only that range of combat. Your grappling must be better than a grappler's, your kicking must be better than a kicker's and your punching must be better than a puncher's. It's a tough task, to be sure. Another school of thought holds that you should never fight force with the same kind of force. In other words, don't try to beat your opponent at what he does best. Instead, use a set of concepts and techniques that will enable you to nullify his attacks and nail him when he's not expecting it. The best set of concepts I've found is called the science of wing chun, as taught by Black Belt Hall of Fame member William Cheung. It offers a strategic approach to combat that's guaranteed to help any stand-up fighter prevail on the street. [ti_billboard name="Neutral Stance"]

Maintain a Balanced Stance

When you're in a balanced wing chun stance, your opponent won't be able to read your intentions because you're not telegraphing the way you'll fight. He can't discern your commitment to any move or to any direction. The stance requires a 50-50 weight distribution at all times. That enables you to move either foot in any direction at anytime. Having maximum mobility, at a moment's notice, is essential for dealing with armed or multiple attackers. Being balanced also conserves energy, which allows you to channel it to other uses while under attack. Once your opponent moves, wing chun teaches that you should immediately shift into a side-neutral stance based on the side of your body he attacks. If he comes from your right, you deal with him by using your right arm and right foot, and vice versa. Your stance is now similar to that of a boxer, except that you're oriented at a 45-degree angle so you're less open to his blows. [ti_billboard name="Balance Disruption"]

Attack Your Opponent's Balance

In any kind of fighting, balance is everything. Strive to maintain yours while attacking your opponent's. Often, that entails getting him to lean too far into his technique, overcommit to his movement or overextend his body. Without proper balance, he won't be able to move, block or strike effectively. In general, grapplers employ a strategy that involves an overzealous commitment to a move. They'll lean, lunge or throw themselves forward in an effort to take you to the ground, which is their preferred environment. At that point, they'll attempt to mount you and punch, or they'll choke you unconscious. That's all well and good as long as you don't take advantage of their momentary lack of balance

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On March 8, 2007, reality-based self-defense expert Mick Coup visited the offices of Black Belt to be photographed for a feature article in the August 2007 issue. In the article, "Reach Out and Touch Someone," Mick Coup discusses the role of indexing and how this age-old skill--when properly tuned up and utilized--can propel your self-defense ability forward by a quantum leap. Mick Coup demonstrated several techniques and theories from his long history of martial arts training, six of which were captured on video. Mick Coup is the founder of Core Combatives. The England-based self-defense instructor has trained in jujutsu, kung fu, kickboxing and karate for 25 years. He currently works as a security specialist and military consultant.

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On March 8, 2007, reality-based self-defense expert Mick Coup visited the offices of Black Belt to be photographed for a feature article in the August 2007 issue. In the article, "Reach Out and Touch Someone," Coup discusses the role of indexing and how this age-old skill--when properly tuned up and utilized--can propel your self-defense ability forward by a quantum leap. He demonstrated several techniques and theories from his long history of martial arts training, six of which were captured on video. Coup is the founder of Core Combatives. The England-based self-defense instructor has trained in jujutsu, kung fu, kickboxing and karate for 25 years. He currently works as a security specialist and military consultant.

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