athletic injury prevention

Years of hard-core training drills may be doing more harm than good at this point -- and a crippling overuse injury may be in your near future, says an orthopedic surgeon specializing in sports medicine.

I recently saw a fit 74-year-old patient who’d practiced wing chun and tai chi chuan for many years. He came to me because of shoulder pain that was bothering him during the performance of his everyday activities. Even doing slow tai chi forms was problematic because he couldn’t raise his arms above his shoulders anymore. He feared he’d no longer be able to practice or teach his arts.

Keep Reading Show less

Holistic recovery from a martial arts injury is entirely possible! In part 2 of their guide to overcoming martial athletic injuries, Danny Dring and Johnny D. Taylor explain the roles that mind, body, attitude and outside support play in this process.

Editor's Note: This is a continuation from Part 1 of BlackBeltMag.com's guide to overcoming martial athletic injuries. For more information on this topic, consult the co-authors' full-color book: Stay in the Fight: A Martial Athlete's Guide to Preventing and Overcoming Injury. Think Holistic When Considering Treatment of Martial Athletic Injuries To optimize healing and your state of mind during recovery from martial athletic injuries, you must address as many components of health and wellness as possible. The six primary components are the following:
  • Strength: Ask your doctor when and how you can lift weights or do resistance exercises.
  • Cardiovascular health: Also ask to what degree you can maintain your endurance level.
  • Flexibility: The inactivity often associated with recovery from martial athletic injuries doesn’t always have to result in a loss of flexibility. In fact, you may find that you now have time to focus on it.
  • Nutrition: Your body has been traumatized by an injury and requires top-notch nutrition to rebuild. The best diet is complete in terms of proteins, carbohydrates and fats, as well as vitamins, minerals and trace elements. Take time to study what you need and then consume it.
  • Hydration: Every athlete knows the importance of water in a workout, so don’t let inactivity result in dehydration. Keep the water flowing.
  • Rest: The best healing and the best attitude require the best rest. During your recuperation time, you may discover that a sufficient amount of deep, undisturbed sleep will not only heal your body more quickly but also refresh your mind.

Get "fit to fight" with this FREE download!
MMA Workouts 101: How to Start an MMA Conditioning Program for More Effective MMA Techniques and Self-Defense Moves

Keep Reading Show less

Get proactive in your recovery from martial arts injuries! Learn how phrase such as "restricted activity," "surgery" and "therapy" don't necessarily mean your martial arts journey is drawing to a close.

Sidelined. Restricted activity. Surgery. Therapy. Those words have the power to drag down the spirits of any martial artist. When you’ve been taken out of your game by sickness or injury, you discover a whole new team of opponents standing between you and your rapid return to training and competition. And the longer it takes to get back in the game, the more prone you are to experiencing injury-related depression. Depression, that energy-sapping, happiness-stealing frame of mind, is almost certain to visit any athlete who’s been sidelined because of injury. And it will kick you while you’re down. So be prepared to fight back should you find it attacking you. Depression During Martial Athletic Injuries Here are a few reasons injured athletes fall prey to depression:
  • The injury itself: The knowledge that you’re injured is enough to darken your mood.
  • Pain: The chronic pain that accompanies many injuries can wear down your attitude.
  • Months of hard work down the tubes: Inactivity brings atrophy, causing hard-fought gains in physical ability and skill to disappear.

Get "fit to fight" with this FREE download!
MMA Workouts 101: How to Start an MMA Conditioning Program for More Effective MMA Techniques and Self-Defense Moves

Keep Reading Show less

Martial arts master and dynamic breathing expert Mike Gillette discusses the physical toll one bend and multiple bends of various objects have on the human body. He equates multiple bends as having endured several strenous fitness workouts consecutively. You be the judge. Try it yourself! Learn more from the Web site posted at the end of the video.

Keep Reading Show less