Benny Urquidez

Benny "The Jet" Urquidez is a six-time World Kickboxing Champion and member of the Black Belt Hall of Fame. Urquidez began training at three years old, and competing at five.

In 1974, Urquidez entered the world of full-contact karate. That year, the World Series of Martial Arts Championship was held in Hawaii. The tournament was more of a gladiator fight than anything else – different styles were pitted against each other with few rules and no weight divisions. At five-foot-six and 140 pounds, Urquidez had slim chances - however, he won, and earned a reputation as a fighter who would take any match and any challenge.

Urquidez has since retired from combat. Today, his main passion is teaching the Ukidokan system of karate, which he created. He joined Black Belt Magazine for the Fight Back event to help raise funds for the Red Cross' efforts to support first responders and medical staff fighting COVID-19.


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Benny Urquidez was kickboxing's most fearless gladiator. With his incredible speed, power and energy, he could go to any country on earth, fight anybody he was paired up with according to their rules — and beat the living daylights out of them. In front of sell-out crowds, Benny Urquidez, in true terminator fashion, would blast opponent after opponent into oblivion. What is so amazing is that he did this 58 times without losing. It's not surprising that he was named Black Belt's 1978 Competitor of the Year.

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Benny "The Jet" Urquidez will be featured on the upcoming April/May 2014 issue of Black Belt magazine! To get you primed for his appearance, Urquidez talks on camera about his busy life as a martial arts instructor.

With a stellar record in kickboxing and full-contact karate, Benny "The Jet" Urquidez has a reputation for effectiveness with his kicks, punches, elbows and knees, which makes it that much easier to believe him when he talks about the multiple-opponent situations in which he was involved. And as the founder of ukidokan karate — a comprehensive martial art with marked self-defense leanings — Benny Urquidez knows a thing or two about mixing it up outside the ring. At a recent Black Belt shoot, it didn't take much persuading to get Benny Urquidez, 61 — and as much in possession of the eye of the tiger as ever — to open up about his storied past. It was one of those rare times when we believed every word we heard. In the April/May 2014 issue of Black Belt magazine — on sale in late March/early April 2014 — you can read our exclusive cover story with Benny Urquidez and see what he had to say about a variety of topics, including his experiences with ...

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Part of being a complete martial artist is knowing how practitioners of other styles think and fight. This article will provide an introduction to Brazilian jiu-jitsu, judo, sambo, shootfighting and wrestling — and clue you in as to how you might defeat people who do them.

Part of being a complete martial artist is knowing how practitioners of other styles think, train and fight. This article will provide an introduction to five popular grappling arts — Brazilian jiu-jitsu, judo, sambo, shootfighting and wrestling — and clue you in as to how you might defeat people who train in them. Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu The basic strategy of the Brazilian jiu-jitsu stylist is to mount or submit his opponent — by outlasting him, if necessary. He’s almost always superbly conditioned aerobically (to endure a long fight) and muscularly (to prevent the buildup of lactic acid in the muscles when clinching for eternity). He generally is very patient, slim and smart, and often described as “unbelievable on the ground.” His weaknesses include the fact that he usually trains and fights while wearing a uniform. Without it, he has no extra “handles” on his opponent and loses the ability to execute many chokes. His standing techniques, including takedowns and striking, are often weak. Secret: Overpower him in the first moments of a fight. Don’t stay in his guard. Use techniques that are illegal in his type of competition: low strikes, groin attacks, etc. Whatever you do, don’t try to beat him at his own game, for then you will be the underdog. Judo The strengths of the judoka include throws, chokes and joint locks. Therefore, his basic strategy revolves around throwing his opponent to earn points and, if possible, making him submit.

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