Succeeding in 2020 at the Virtual Summit

If one thing in 2020 has been consistent, it's that the year has required us to change.

It's changed how we do business. It's changed how we interact with people. On a more profound level, it's changed society.

When the 2019 SuperShow came to a close, all of us – everyone at Century Martial Arts, Black Belt Magazine, and the Martial Arts Industry Association, that is – left feeling so excited and inspired for the next show. The 2020 event was going to be awesome. We were already late in the planning stages when COVID-19 shook up our lives, like the violent hands of a toddler on a delicate Etch-a-sketch drawing, and then that had to change too.

Instead of being held live in Las Vegas, the 2020 SuperShow took to computer screens to become the 2020 Virtual Summit. You can't top the luxury of Vegas, but the virtual format of the show had its own advantages that made it equally life-changing! Thanks to our incredible speakers and sponsors like PerfectMind, MyStudio, and SISU, we were able to quickly change (that word again) some of the seminars to new, updated topics that better reflected the emerging needs of martial arts school owners.

Digital curriculum planning, Zoom lessons, and how to work within lockdowns were all topics covered at the 2020 Virtual Summit. Some particular highlights include:

  • Keynote speech by retired Navy SEAL officer and author Jocko Willink
  • "Racism and Diversity in Martial Arts," an insightful panel discussion with Oakland PD officer and black belt Damon Gilbert, martial arts school owners/head instructors Akil Acevedo and Tommy Todd, and MAIA Executive Director Frank Silverman
  • A seminar from Melody Johnson on how school owners can help their youngest students through the emotional impacts of the COVID pandemic
  • Century Direct and MyStudio developer Tu Le alongside Kid Kicks CEO and head instructor John Bussard with a timely how-to on drop shipping (a lifesaver for school owners who need retail profit, but also have to have a zero-contact option)
  • JKD Athletic Association founder Sifu Harinder Singh's aptly named "Unshakeable Confidence: How to Thrive in Chaos" seminar
  • A live workout from martial arts film icon Cynthia Rothrock
  • A BJJ training session with 4th degree black belt and world champion André Galvão
  • Tons of actionable content from MAIA consultants including Cris Rodriguez, Adam Parman, Jason Flame, Shane Tassoul and Mike Metzger
  • And even a comedy break from Master Ken!

All attendees had the option of purchasing an extra pass which enabled them to ask live, real-time questions during post-seminar Q&A sessions, so the content goes beyond what's even here!

If you weren't able to attend the Virtual Summit, you're still not too late. The information within is too valuable to be missed, so we're keeping it available for as long as possible. Right now, you can purchase recordings of all the Virtual Summit seminars for only $147. You can stream over 30 hours on demand, share them with your team, and replay them as often as you need, whenever you want. And although a lot has changed, the high quality and value of the information you'll get from any SuperShow event, virtual or not, never will!

We'll see you next year in Vegas. Until then, stay safe, and happy training!

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