Stick-Fighting Video: Richard Bustillo on Translating Sinawali to Empty-Hand Techniques

In this exclusive video, Bruce Lee student, Black Belt Hall of Fame member and escrima master Richard Bustillo bridges the gap betweeen stick-fighting moves and empty-hand fighting!

Richard Bustilloi s a first-generation student of jeet kune do founder Bruce Lee. Inducted into the Black Belt Hall of Fame as the 1989 Co-Instructor of the Year, Bustillo has devoted much of his life to preserving and propagating the teachings of his late master. A longtime practitioner of boxing, Thai boxing, escrima, kajukenbo, wrestling, jujitsu, tai chi chuan and silat, Bustillo has evolved his own version of the Bruce Lee fighting style and jeet kune do techniques — as well as the other martial arts he has studied in-depth and continues to teach — at his IMB Academy in Torrance, California. In this exclusive new footage shot at the Black Bel tmagazine photo studios, Bustillo demonstrates sinawali and how these stick-fighting techniques can translate into empty-hand fighting techniques


SINAWALI/EMPTY-HAND FIGHTING VIDEO
A Stick-Fighting Master Demonstrates the Relationship Between Sinawali and Empty-Hand Fighting

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"This is the Filipino art of sinawali — double sticks — which is going to be transposed to empty-hand [techniques]," the legendary stick-fighting master says. "You can defend with sticks and tie it up to end up in a throw. The weapons training is to coordinate the empty-hand [moves]. The weapons is just an extension of the limb."

For more videos and articles featuring this Black Belt Hall of Fame member, check out these pages:

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