Self Defense

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine signed into law a "Stand your ground" bill on Monday after initially indicating he might veto it. The bill expands the use of deadly force in self defense situations by no longer requiring people to first try and retreat before employing such force in defense of themselves or another person when they are outside their home or vehicle.

Ohio now becomes the 36th state to enact such legislation. DeWine had previously indicated he might veto the bill if it did not include provisions that he said would make it more difficult for criminals to possess firearms. Though he did ultimately sign the legislation, DeWine expressed his disappointment by the lack of progress on gun law reform.

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In 2010, the editor of Black Belt encountered top-tier firearms instructor Louis Awerbuck at a Bruce Lee Foundation event. Their conversation led to this insightful article!

When I attended The Art of Action in 2010, the convention put on by the Bruce Lee Foundation, I thought I recognized the face of a gentleman across the room. He was in the front of the hall, chatting with Linda Lee Cadwell and Shannon Lee. I judged him too important to be a mere attendee, so I scanned the pages of the event program and spotted his name: Louis Awerbuck, one of the world's premier firearms instructors. As soon as the action let up, I made a beeline for him and introduced myself. When he said he's always been drawn to Eastern teachings and the philosophy of Bruce Lee, I asked him if he'd care to write a piece for Black Belt. It's presented below for your enjoyment. It was originally published in the May 2010 issue of Black Belt and was titled "The Final Weapon." Sadly, Mr. Awerbuck passed away June 24, 2014. — EditorMark Twain once said, "I never let my schooling interfere with my education." Point duly noted. Looking past the wry humor, however, it's also important to note that there are some small candles of information ignited during an adolescent's school years that actually help illuminate one's path in later years. When I was a young puppy attending high school in the early 1960s, there were no personal computers, and we weren't allowed to use a slide rule to solve math problems on homework or test papers. Since we were 16-year-olds — and obviously already knew everything about everything — we didn't understand why our stupid teachers wouldn't allow the use of auxiliary man-made equipment to augment the human brain. After all, as teenagers, we obviously knew more than our parents, teachers, Einstein and Confucius combined.

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Defense against weapons has always been a heated topic among martial artists and self-defense practitioners. Opinions vary based on style, background and experience, but the seriousness of the subject requires that everyone think about it because trying an ineffective H2HC technique in real street fights can get you killed. One critic of commonly taught weapons defenses in hand-to-hand-combat training is Montreal-based Richard Dimitri, founder of senshido. Richard Dimtri notes that many H2HC instructors would rather modify reality to fit their system than adapt their system to fit real life. Example: the H2HC training partner who attacks in a manner that makes the defense work or who holds his weapon in a position that makes it easy to execute the prescribed disarm.

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In the Panhellenic games of ancient Greece, wrestling, boxing and pankration were called the “heavy events.” The term was chosen to describe combative contests in those arts because they were not only crowd favorites but also the domain of the larger and heavier athlete.

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How do U.S. Army soldiers handle opponents armed with knives? Their top combatives expert (who just happened to write their modern hand-to-hand combat manual) shows you three methods he's taught them.

Editor's Note: In this exclusive close-quarters-combat video, Matt Larsen — Modern Army Combatives Program (MACP) creator and author of the critically acclaimed book Modern Army Combatives: Battle-Proven Techniques and Training Methods — discusses and demonstrates training protocols for assessing and responding to opponents armed with edged weapons. Modern Army Combatives Trains Soldiers to Efficiently Employ Self-Defense Moves for Any Situation Knife fights don't really start in the way that a lot of people train for. They don't start, for example, with the knife in somebody's hand. They start just like any other fight, only one of the people has a knife on his or her person. So the first thing is: How do you know whether the person you're fighting is armed with a knife or a gun — or anything? Most of the time you don't, so you have to fight everyone as if they're armed.

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