Self-defense expert Richard Ryan gives Black Belt magazine a four-minute mini-seminar on how speed-hand striking can help women escape close-quarters attacks in this exclusive video!


As one of the nation's leading authorities on self-protection and tactical weapons training, Richard Ryan is a longtime advocate of the scientific approach to self-defense. Richard Ryan is the founder of the Dynamic Combat Method and the co-founder of iCAT (Integrated Combative Arts Training) with Joe Lewis and Walt Lysak Jr. In this nearly four-minute mini-seminar video, the reality-based martial arts expert discusses the palm vs. the fist, using speed to one's advantage and how to open up the chance to escalate a conflict or escape an attacker.


REALITY-BASED MARTIAL ARTS VIDEO
Richard Ryan Goes In-Depth With the Concept of Speed Striking

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Is There an "Ultimate" Technique?

"Obviously, every situation is different," says reality-based martial arts expert Richard Ryan, "so you're not going to have any one thing that's gonna generically be able to take care of all sorts of situations. But the possibility that a woman gets accosted by somebody who ... thinks that they're physically superior ... that's a good advantage for her because she can use the element of surprise. [For the element of surprise], we teach what's called a speed hand."

What Does the Speed Hand Look Like?

To see the speed hand in action, watch the video above!

In verbally describing the speed-hand technique, Richard Ryan says, "What we do is teach ... how to just strike out and catch a person right in the eye/nose area — almost like a pushing action. What that will do ... is at least buy one second, one moment to do something. [Once you've gotten the speed hand in], run like hell in the other direction."

Tips for Execution of the Speed Hand

"Head down, knees bent, hands up, try to deflect anything that you can possibly deflect," Richard Ryan explains, "and, the moment you can, drive your open hand into their facial area and run."

What's More Important? Speed or Force?

Richard Ryan explains in-depth and takes the principles behind the speed-hand strike into action in the video above!

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