Richard Bustillo’s JKD Techniques: Clinch Counter

Whether it's a flat tire on the freeway or a bully in the hallway, we all find ourselves in dangerous situations from time to time. Even if you're the world's greatest striker, you may end up getting caught in your opponent's clinch. Fortunately, we've got jeet kune do master Richard Bustillo to help you escape.

“Normally, you don't want to get into a grappling situation on the street, but if you're in this position, you can execute a technique such as this one," he says. “It's still risky because the energy can change at anytime. You have to be able to adapt and possibly switch to some other technique. You should always have options."


Jeet Kune Do Technique: Clinch Counter

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Cup your right hand around the back of his neck, and rest your left hand on his right arm. “Your left hand shoves his right elbow across the front of his throat," Bustillo says. “You then step to his right and bend your right arm to lock his right arm between his neck and your shoulder."

For more techniques and training advice from Richard Bustillo, check out The Ultimate Guide to Jeet Kune Do.

Next, place your left hand on top of his head and lock your right hand onto your left biceps. That completes the figure-4 lock that constricts the flow of blood to his brain. “You can submit him from this position using the carotid choke, or you can add a knee thrust to the solar plexus," Bustillo says. “The knee strike takes away his balance and shocks his system. It lets you choke him more easily. If you try to go right to the choke, a lot of times he can defend himself or counter it, so you may have to take those options away by shocking his system.

Richard Bustillo's JKD Techniques Series

Part One: Hammerfist Combo

Part Three: Kick Interception

Photo by Kem West
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