Hiroki Akimoto

On Friday, October 16, ONE Championship's latest offering, ONE: Reign of Dynasties II, hit the airwaves.

In the main event of the six-bout card, Hiroki Akimoto moved up to bantamweight to take on "Muay Thai Boy" Zhang Chenglong in ONE Super Series action.

Zhang's older brother, Zhang Chunyu, met Muay Thai legend Sagetdao Petpayathai in the co-main event to make it a family affair in Singapore.

Main Event: Hiroki Akimoto vs. Zhang Chenglong

Akimoto Winner by Split Decision

Round 3 - 3:00

The three-round main event went down to the wire as noted by the split decision. In the end, Hiroki Akimoto edged out "Muay Thai Boy" Zhang Chenglong to make an immediate impact in his bantamweight campaign. The dazzling speed of the Japanese athlete did just enough to get the nod, but Zhang was a game opponent who was nearly his equal in Singapore.

Sagetdao Petpayathai vs. Zhang Chunyu

Sagetdao Winner by Unanimous Decision

Keanu Subba vs. Tang Kai

Tang Winner by Unanimous Decision

​Azwan Che Wil vs. Wang Wenfeng

Wang Winner by Unanimous Decision

Ryuto Sawada vs. Miao Li Tao

Sawada Winner by Unanimous Decision

Mohammed Bin Mahmoud vs. Han Zi Hao

Han Winner by KO


ONE: REIGN OF DYNASTIES II | Fight Highlights www.youtube.com

Muay Thai legend Sagetdao Petpayathai returned to ONE Super Series action with a decision victory over China's Zhang Chunyu. Sagetdao put on a clinic of a high-level Muay Thai technique over the three-rounds to breeze to the scorecards.

Tang Kai welcomed Keanu Subba back to the ONE Circle with a 15-minute battle that saw the Chinese athlete stay in his face the whole way. Tang's striking was on point, but Subba would not wilt. Tang took a dominant decision with his pressure to serve notice in the featherweight division.

In the opening bout, the lone finish of the evening occured when Han Zi Zao dropped Mohammed Bin Mahmoud with a combination ending in a stiff left jab.

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