On Monday, ONE Championship formally announced its next two events: No Surrender II & III. The events will take place on August 14 and August 21, respectively, and feature six bouts per card.

On July 31, ONE returned with ONE: No Surrender. The successful event marked their first event back since the COVID-19 pandemic began, and officially kickstarted their return to a full event schedule.

At ONE: No Surrender II, Saemapetch Fairtex and Rodlek PK.Saenchai Muaythaigym will meet in the evening's main event with eyes toward a potential bantamweight title shot with a victory. The remainder of the card is lined with an additional two Muay Thai bouts, two mixed martial arts contests, and a kickboxing co-main event between Leo Pinto and Mehdi Zatout.

One week later, another bantamweight Muay Thai affair will be showcased in ONE: No Surrender III's main event. Sangmanee Klong SuanPluResort takes on Kulabdam Sor. Jor. Piek Uthai as the event's premier contest.

Three more Muay Thai bouts fill the card along with two mixed martial arts matches.

As the event schedule heats up, ONE is bringing the best martial artists from around the world to compete on its global stage.

ONE: NO SURRENDER II

  • Saemapetch Fairtex vs. Rodlek PK.Saenchai Muaythaigym (ONE Super Series Muay Thai – bantamweight)
  • Leo Pinto vs. Mehdi Zatout (ONE Super Series kickboxing – bantamweight)
  • Pongsiri Mitsatit vs. Akihiro Fujisawa (mixed martial arts – catchweight of 59.5 kilograms)
  • Sorgraw Petchyindee Academy vs. Pongsiri PK.Saenchai Muaythaigym (ONE Super Series Muay Thai – featherweight)
  • Yodkaikaew Fairtex vs. John Shink (mixed martial arts – flyweight)
  • Huang Ding vs. Fahdi Khaled (ONE Super Series Muay Thai – flyweight)

ONE: NO SURRENDER III

  • Sangmanee Klong SuanPluResort vs. Kulabdam Sor. Jor. Piek Uthai (ONE Super Series Muay Thai – bantamweight)
  • Mongkolpetch Petchyindee Academy vs. Sok Thy (ONE Super Series Muay Thai – flyweight)
  • Shannon Wiratchai vs. Fabio Pinca (mixed martial arts – featherweight)
  • Wondergirl Fairtex vs. Brooke Farrell (ONE Super Series Muay Thai – strawweight)
  • Marie Ruumet vs. Little Tiger (ONE Super Series Muay Thai – atomweight)
  • Ben Royle vs. Quitin Thomas (mixed martial arts – featherweight)
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