ONE Championship Inside the Matrix

ONE: Inside The Matrix IV closed out the "Inside The Matrix" event series for ONE Championship on Friday, November 20.

ONE Super Series kickboxing action headlined the evening with Russia's Aslanbek Zikreev edging out Wang "Golden Boy" Junguang in a catch weight bout. But it was a night full of competitive and fun action.

Three of the four undercard bouts ended with finishes and the back-and-forth Muay Thai battle between Rocky Ogden and Joseph Lasiri was worth the price of admission alone.

Main Event: Aslanbek Zikreev vs. Wang Junguang

Zikreeve Winner by Split Decision

Round 3 - 3:00

#2-ranked strawweight kickboxing contender Wang "Golden Boy" Junguang made it a close contest, but Russian Aslanbek Zikreev captured the split decision victory in their catch weight contest. Zikreev's performance firmly supplants him on the map in ONE Super Series as a new star. The exciting three-round battle gave both men their moments, but only one could get their hand raised.

Rocky Ogden vs. Joseph Lasiri

Lasiri Winner by Split Decision

Rocky Ogden and Joseph Lasiri had a back-and-forth battle for all three rounds, but it was the Italian who came out the otherside with a narrow split decision victory. In the final and deciding round, Lasiri's aggression and elbows did enough to warrant the win.

Bruno Pucci vs. Kwon Won Il

Kwon Winner by TKO

It was all-action when Bruno Pucci and Kwon Won Il's match began, but after Kwon defended a takedown his striking took over and closed the show inside the first round. A debilitating body blow left Pucci as a sitting duck to a couple right hands before a heavy uppercut finally sent him to the canvas. Kwon's dominant showing should set him up for bigger things in the new year.

Ryogo Takahashi vs. Yoon Chang Min

Takahashi Winner by KO

Featherweight contender Ryogo Takahashi also made a statement with a second-round win over Yoon Chang Min. Takahashi's heavy hands stunned Yoon in the second round, and he quickly piled up the combinations to keep his opponent reeling. Soon, a sweeping right uppercut would be enough to help finish the battle.

Maira Mazar vs. Choi Jeong Yun

Mazar Winner by TKO


ONE: INSIDE THE MATRIX IV | Fight Highlights www.youtube.com

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