Noel Plaugher The One Muay Thai Kick

There are 67 official throws in Judo. Xing Yi Quan has 5 element forms, twelve animal forms, linking forms, and weapons forms. Shou Shu Kung fu has over 100 techniques. No doubt, the art you study has a plethora of material as well. What if you focused on one thing?

While it is exciting to learn that next new technique, and amass a wealth of material, what if you chose one thing (kick, punch, throw, submission), and wrung every ounce of power, application and use from it? What if you refined that one thing and made it your ultimate "go to" technique? Take one thing and make it your best.


The first step is to choose something.

Karate Kids Front Kick

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No matter what art you study, you can take one technique and make it your best, make it your prized move. Depending on what you study that could mean choosing a kick, punch, throw, choke, lock, etc.

Next, start to refine and perfect it.

Practice Kick in Mirror

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Make your movement steady and consistent. Use a mirror or better yet, video yourself practicing the technique. Is the motion clean? Is there a lot of extraneous motion? Be your own harshest critic. Try videoing yourself from multiple angles. Have a friend watch you. An extra pair of eyes can be revealing.

The last step is to find and perfect applications.

Anderson Silva Front Kick

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Again, start slow. Start with the obvious and then begin to brainstorm: How many ways can you apply this technique? Let's say you chose a kick or a choke, and assuming you want to use it in competition, how can you use it offensively? Defensively? How can you set it up? Can you apply it in different angles? What about variations? Have you seen variations of it already? Can you come up with a variation of the variation?

You can see how in short order you are moving toward making an incredibly useful technique. The process will help you to get the most out of the knowledge you have. As martial arts are often directly applicable to life, ask yourself, How can I apply this idea to my job or school work? However, if you'd rather not think of that, then just grab another technique and get to work. Focus. Eliminate distraction. Practice. Forge your one.

Dr. Craig's Martial Arts Movie Lounge

When The Fast and the Furious (2001) sped into the psyche's of illegal street racing enthusiasts, with a penchant for danger and the psychotic insanity of arrant automotive adventure, the brusque bearish, quasi-hero rebel, Dominic "Dom" Toretto was caustic yet salvationally portrayed with the power of a train using a Vin Diesel engine.

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The skill of stick fighting as a handy weapon dates from the prehistory of mankind. The stick has got an advantage over the stone because it could be used both for striking and throwing. In lots of countries worlwide when dealing with martial arts there is a special place for fighters skillful in stick fighting. ( India, China, Japan, Korea, New Zealand, countries of Africa, Europe and Americas etc).

The short stick as a handy weapon has been used as a means of self-defence from animals and later various attackers. Regarding its length it was better than the long stick, primarily because it was easier to carry and use. The short stick as a means of self-defence was used namely in all countries of the world long time ago.

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The Czech Republic's Lukas Krpalek put himself in the history books Friday when he became only the third judoka to ever win Olympic gold medals in two different weight categories claiming the men's +100 kg division in Tokyo. Krpalek, who won the under 100 kg class at the 2016 Rio Olympics, hit a throw with time running out in the finals against Georgia's Guram Tushishvili and went into a hold down to pin Tushishvili for the full point to earn his second Olympic championship. Meanwhile, two-time defending +100 kg champion Teddy Riner of France, considered by some the greatest judoka in history, was upset in the quarter finals and had to settle for the bronze.

On the women's side, Akira Sone helped Japan break its own record for most judo gold medals in a single Olympics when she claimed her country's ninth gold of the tournament capturing the women's +78 kg division against Cuba's Idalys Ortiz. The win came in somewhat anticlimactic fashion as no throws were landed and Ortiz lost on penalties in overtime.