Noel Plaugher The One Muay Thai Kick

There are 67 official throws in Judo. Xing Yi Quan has 5 element forms, twelve animal forms, linking forms, and weapons forms. Shou Shu Kung fu has over 100 techniques. No doubt, the art you study has a plethora of material as well. What if you focused on one thing?

While it is exciting to learn that next new technique, and amass a wealth of material, what if you chose one thing (kick, punch, throw, submission), and wrung every ounce of power, application and use from it? What if you refined that one thing and made it your ultimate "go to" technique? Take one thing and make it your best.


The first step is to choose something.

Karate Kids Front Kick

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No matter what art you study, you can take one technique and make it your best, make it your prized move. Depending on what you study that could mean choosing a kick, punch, throw, choke, lock, etc.

Next, start to refine and perfect it.

Practice Kick in Mirror

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Make your movement steady and consistent. Use a mirror or better yet, video yourself practicing the technique. Is the motion clean? Is there a lot of extraneous motion? Be your own harshest critic. Try videoing yourself from multiple angles. Have a friend watch you. An extra pair of eyes can be revealing.

The last step is to find and perfect applications.

Anderson Silva Front Kick

themmaguru.com

Again, start slow. Start with the obvious and then begin to brainstorm: How many ways can you apply this technique? Let's say you chose a kick or a choke, and assuming you want to use it in competition, how can you use it offensively? Defensively? How can you set it up? Can you apply it in different angles? What about variations? Have you seen variations of it already? Can you come up with a variation of the variation?

You can see how in short order you are moving toward making an incredibly useful technique. The process will help you to get the most out of the knowledge you have. As martial arts are often directly applicable to life, ask yourself, How can I apply this idea to my job or school work? However, if you'd rather not think of that, then just grab another technique and get to work. Focus. Eliminate distraction. Practice. Forge your one.

How will you perform at the moment of truth?

What's going to happen to you physically and emotionally in a real fight where you could be injured or killed? Will you defend yourself immediately, hesitate during the first few critical seconds of the fight, or will you be so paralyzed with fear that you won't be able to move at all? The answer is - you won't know until you can say, "Been there, done that." However, there is a way to train for that fearful day.

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