Bellator

Experience is indeed a very good teacher.

No one would disagree that it is probably a good idea that their doctor for example has had some real-world experience before he gives you a diagnosis or treatment. Even more so if there is an operating table involved. You want him/her to have done it before – whatever that it may be. On the other hand, when it comes to your favorite entertainment production, you will no doubt hear the participants say something like this: "We wanted to do something that has never been done before." This is of course seen as a good thing and innovative. However, no one ever wants their doctor, or mechanic, or contractor, or barber to say that! In some scenarios having experience is deemed best while in others the pursuit of the unknown is seen as noble. Not mentioned is if those who have not done the thing in question and have no experience have any sort of right to comment on how those who have do it. Can one who has never given a haircut comment or criticize a barber for giving a bad one? Can a non-chef criticize a meal?

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For years practitioners have sought out the style of martial arts for what works best in all situations.

In the early days of MMA the Gracie's and BJJ reigned supreme and by most accounts was the dominant style when it came to combat. Since that time MMA has gone through phases where we have seen wrestling and kickboxing also have their dominate champions. I think that most practitioners will now tell you that a mixture of both standing and ground skills are needed to be successful in the cage as well as on the street. But, what if I told you that there is a lesser known combat style that gives you the advantages of lighting quick strikes and has been the base for a number of successful MMA fighters over the years.

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Bellator MMA announced on Thursday that, for the first time in their history, they will implement an official ranking system. The first set of rankings, which will come out in April, will be voted upon by a panel of 15 media members that includes reporters for several prominent mixed martial arts websites as well as major media outlets like CBS Sports and the Russian news agency TASS.

Besides the champion, the top ten contenders for each of Bellator's seven men's divisions and two women's divisions will be ranked. Fighters must have competed at least once for Bellator on their current term and have fought within the prior 15 months to be eligible for a ranking. Fighters will remain eligible for 60 days following an announced retirement and can be ranked in more than one weight class as long as they have competed at that weight within the last 15 months.


Tuesday it was announced Bellator MMA would be entering an exclusive partnership with Showtime to broadcast all of their live events. The mixed martial arts organization plans on staging about two shows a month for the rest of the year starting with an April 2 card from the Mohegan Sun Casino in Connecticut that will feature featherweight champion Patricio Freire.

The promotion has bounced around broadcasters for several years having been televised on the Paramount Network, the DAZN streaming service and most recently the CBS Sports Network. They now make the move to a premium cable channel but Showtime will be offering a free 30-day trial followed by a six-month rate of $4.99 a month. Bellator president Scott Coker had previously worked with Showtime when he was president of the now defunct Strikeforce promotion and their events were broadcast on the channel.