Bruce Lee

Be Water is the latest documentary in the 30 for 30 series. It chronicles Lee's life from his early days, including a sometimes-turbulent childhood, to his first foray into teaching kung fu into America, his start in film and return to Hong Kong, where he made the films that would launch him into stardom.

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By Michael Connor

On July 20, 1973, Bruce Lee, founder of jeet kune do, passed away in Hong Kong. He’ll always be remembered for his movies, which continue to captivate audiences around the world. Perhaps that’s why he was named one of the top 100 most influential people of the 20th century.
Lee’s legacy lives on, and his art of JKD is practiced daily in countless countries. One of his many devoted followers is Dr. Z, a practitioner of the martial arts and the medical arts, as well as a filmmaker. He has a fascinating background and is planning an equally fascinating future.

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Bruce Lee's Tao of Jeet Kune Do is the best-selling martial arts book in the world. You knew that. But what you might not have known is it almost didn't get published.

Ask any martial artist to name the best-selling martial arts book of all time, and chances are he or she will say Tao of Jeet Kune Do by Bruce Lee.

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Learn how the friendship Bruce Lee and Leo Fong shared impacted the development of Fong's martial arts skills and the course of his life.

When Bruce Lee moved to Oakland, California, in 1964, he stayed at the home of his friend and student James Yimm Lee. Over the next few years, Bruce Lee modified the wing chun kung fu he’d learned in Hong Kong, mixing it with boxing and other arts. During that period, Bruce Lee met and became friends with Leo Fong, a former Golden Gloves boxer and AAU champ who was learning kung fu from some of San Francisco’s top masters. The time they spent together ultimately changed the course of martial arts history.

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The details of Bruce Lee's jeet kune do have filled numerous books, leaving newcomers wondering where to begin. Here, Joe Lewis, Leo Fong, William Cheung and Burton Richardson share what matters most.

Black Belt contacted 16 well-known martial artists who teach jeet kune do or were heavily influenced by it to get their thoughts on the most important part of Bruce Lee’s art. Part 1 features replies from Dan Inosanto, Tim Tackett, Kelly McCann and Joe Lewis. Part 2 offers the answers we got from Burton Richardson, Matthew J. Numrich, Teri Tom and Richard S. Bustillo. Part 3 includes Leo Fong, Bustillo, Paul Vunak and Gary Dill. Part 4 focuses on the thoughts expressed by Lamar M. Davis II, Dr. Jerry Beasley, Matt Thornton and Thomas Cruise. In this conclusion, we highlight Lewis, Fong, William Cheung and Richardson.

Photo Courtesy of Black Belt

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Free Bruce Lee Guide
Have you ever wondered how Bruce Lee’s boxing influenced his jeet kune do techniques? Read all about it in this free guide.
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