This video biography of Masayuki Shimabukuro was presented during his induction into the 2006 Black Belt Hall of Fame as Weapons Instructor of the Year. Born in Osaka, Japan, in 1948, Masayuki Shimabukuro began his martial arts career with childhood lessons in judo, karate-do and Okinawan kobudo. Upon meeting 20th-generation grandmaster Miura Takeyuki Hidefusa, Masayuki Shimabukuro began a lifelong pursuit of emulating his template for technical mastery and human compassion, grace and humility. In 1976, he moved to Southern California and began teaching shito-ryu karate-do, iaido, jodo and Okinawan kobudo---just in time for the 1980s fascination with samurai weapons and philosophy, which had become one of Masayuki Shimabukuro's specialties. In the early 1990s, Masayuki Shimabukuro became a founding member of the North American Japanese Karate-do Masters Association and now serves on its board of directors. In 1995, Miura Takeyuki Hidefusa appointed Masayuki Shimabukuro international chairman of the Nippoin Kobudo Jikishin-Kai and entrusted him with the dissemination of authentic eishin-ryu swordsmanship. In 2002, Miura Takeyuki Hidefusa awarded Masayuki Shimabukuro the title of hanshi and named him the 21st-generation inheritor designate of muso jikiden eishin-ryu iaijutsu. Masayuki Shimabukuro became a member of the prestigious Dai Nippon Butoku Kai, the oldest martial arts governing body in Japan. In 2003 he wrote the United States Amateur Athletic Union’s competition guidelines for iaido/battodo and served as the chairman for the organization’s iaido/battodo division. In 2006, he was inducted into the Black Belt Hall of Fame as Weapons Instructor of the Year.


Black Belt Magazine has a storied history that dates back all the way to 1961, making 2021 the 60th Anniversary of the world's leading magazine of martial arts. To celebrate six decades of legendary martial arts coverage, take a trip down memory lane by scrolling through some of the most influential covers ever published. From the creators of martial art styles, to karate tournament heroes, to superstars on the silver screen, and everything in between, the iconic covers of Black Belt Magazine act as a time capsule for so many important moments and figures in martial arts history. Keep reading to view the full list of these classic issues.

Keep Reading Show less

When Black Belt Magazine was born in 1961, the Beatles were a start-up band, Sergeant Elvis Presley just left the Army, 77 Sunset Strip and Bonanza were the hot TV shows, and phone numbers started with letters. The mainstream martial art of the era was judo and the Dead Sea was just sick.

Black Belt Magazine is the martial arts' most popular and influential publication and has been so since the early 1960s when the first issues were published. From the contents of those early issues, readers recognized that honor and integrity was behind this new martial arts resource and that its objective was not just profit-making or commercialization. The 1960s work here includes three phases in Black Belt's development. Phase one spans 1961 thru 1964 prior to Black Belt becoming a monthly magazine. Phase two spans 1965 and 1966. Phase three is 1967 thru 1969.

Keep Reading Show less

Matcha has got it all for a martial artist.

It creates focus, energy, concentration, curbs the appetite for weigh-ins. These are some great qualities matcha has. Learn more about matcha and how to get the best matcha to improve your health and performance.

cdn.shopify.com

The quality of matcha should be vibrant or bright green. The vibrant green is called, ceremonial matcha, and is the best. It is used in very important Japanese ceremonies. Less fresh, lower grade or bad matcha will be a dark or dull green without the brightness and almost greenish yellow. Color is very important when choosing matcha. The consistency of matcha will be in a very fine powder form.

Keep Reading Show less