ONE Championship

The global pandemic of COVID-19 has altered our day-to-day lives, including how we are able to train. However, many classes can be taught outdoors with a limited number of students.

As you head off to train, there are several things within your power to help reduce the spread and risk of infection associated with the coronavirus. It is imperative we all play our part to overcome the pandemic.


Here are three tips to help you stay safe while you train your craft outdoors.

TIP 1: First and foremost, hygiene is crucial to your safety and your trainers and potential classmates. You should arrive washed and ready to work. Proper hygiene is the first line of protection against viruses and infection.

Be sure to thoroughly wash your hands if you make any stops before arriving at your class. This will help to mitigate any exposure you may have come in contact with along the way.

As always, following your class, wash with disinfectant soap to maintain your hygiene.

TIP 2: Follow the recommended guidelines from healthcare professionals in your area regarding social distancing to prevent the spread of COVID-19. The recommendations vary by location, so be sure to stay up-to-date on your community's best practices.

The Center for Disease Control (CDC) states, "Spread happens when an infected person coughs, sneezes, or talks, and droplets from their mouth or nose are launched into the air and land in the mouths or noses of people nearby."

Proper distancing will help you to avoid the particles put into the air by others while you train.

TIP 3: With social distancing protocols still in place, it is best to find training exercises that can be completed by yourself to avoid contact with others.

There are a variety of exercises you can do alone such as bag work, jumping rope, shadowboxing, and more. Until distancing restrictions are lifted, you can stay active and sharp with these exercises.

ONE Championship lightweight Shannon "OneShin" Wiratchai demonstrates how you can train with a boxing reflex ball to work on your hand-eye coordination.

Read more tips from ONE Championship here.

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