Martial arts nutrition
A martial artist's diet needs to provide energy and sustainability because of its physical intensity. For a martial artist to reach their maximal potential, they need to optimize their nutrition, not just maximize training. A martial artist needs to eat about 4-6 meals a day with snacks inbetween. Here are a few nutritional diets from some of the best martial artists ever known.

Bruce Lee

Lee believed that a martial artist should only consume what is required and don't eat foods that are not beneficial. Therefore, Lee stayed away from foods that had empty calories, refined sugars, fried foods, and alcohol.

A Typical Day for Bruce 

Breakfast

Bruce would eat a bowl of muesli cereal. This cereal contains whole grains, nuts, and dried fruits. Bruce would use 2% milk in his cereal as well as drink a glass per day. And as for a beverage, he would drink orange juice and tea.

Mid-Morning Snack

Bruce would have juice or a protein drink. He consumed this protein drink two times a day. He would use protein powder for his protein drink, non-instant powdered milk mixed with water or juice. He would add a few eggs, wheat germ, Brewer's yeast, peanut butter, granular lecithin, bananas, and other fruits.

Lunch

Bruce would eat a bowl of meat, vegetables, rice, and drink tea.

Mid-Afternoon Snack

Juice or protein concoction.

Dinner

Bruce would eat spaghetti and salad or rice and vegetables with meat or chicken, drink one glass of 2% milk, and have tea.

Bruce loved tea, and he never drank coffee.

Bruce also used many supplements like ginseng, royal jelly, lecithin granules, bee pollen, natural vitamin E, rose hips, Acerola. Bruce was ahead of his time when it came to taking supplements. And Bruce took natural supplements.

Ronda Rousey

Ronda is similar to Bruce Lee. She only ate what gave her the best energy and nutrition. Her diet is about maximizing her nutrient intake. So, she eats balanced, well, and healthy which allows her to get instant energy by metabolizing fast.

Breakfast

Ronda eats something called a Chia Bowl. It has 2 tbsp chia seeds, 2 tbsp hemp seeds, 2 tbsp oats, agave nectar, 1 tbsp almond butter, ¼ cup raisins, topped off with cinnamon.

She also drinks a cup of Coffee and uses raw coconut oil, stevia and cinnamon.

Lunch
Usually, when she is in training camp, Ronda will eat scrambled eggs with vegetables at noon. She uses vegetables like mushrooms, spinach, peppers, tomato, and avocado. In addition, with turkey bacon and one slice of Ezekiel bread spread with natural butter.

Dinner
Usually around 6 or 7 pm, Ronda has Turkey chili. It is made with four ounces of turkey, beans, asparagus, tomato, avocado, hemp seeds, green and red bell pepper, red onion, tomato, chili spice, and cayenne pepper.

Dessert

Ronda's desert is much different than ice cream. Instead, she eats Greek yogurt with 1 tbsp chia seeds and agave.

Snacks
When Ronda is hungry between meals, she eats Honeycrisp apples with cashews or red grapes with nuts, frozen grapes, almonds, and trail mix.

My go-to smoothie recipe is:
I make a Dolce Power Shake blended with fruit and vegetables—no protein powders or anything. I do this after every morning and evening training.

She Has a Smoothie Straight After a Workout

The smoothie consists of:

*Adding ingredients in this order usually blends easier

One small beetroot
One apple (chopped but unpeeled)
One carrot
1/2 cup of strawberries
1/2 cup of blueberries
1/2 cup of red grapes (no stems)
One whole lemon (peeled)
One handful of spinach
One handful of kale
One silverbeet leaf, no stem

Rousey also uses supplements along with her protein shakes.

Rousey does not eat within three hours of going to bed.

You should notice these two diets are restricted and limited to sugar and refined foods. They eat more but eat balanced and healthy to maximize and optimize their energy.

If you would like to know more about nutrition, training, and health, check out my channel on You Tube.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcTdGuQFH48EgrCmyZ81mig/

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