Martial Arts Kick

Flying triple spinning tornado kicks are certainly impressive. Pull one off, and you'll get a ticket to the cool kids' table for sure.

Just check out the crowd reaction when a full-contact fighter successfully lands a fancy spinning kick. The deafening cheers are enough to inspire any kid to make a midnight bedroom window escape and camp out in front of the local dojo's front door. Admit it: When you started training, you dreamed of these flashy kicks.

The problem is that these kicks, although impressive, aren't very practical. Even at a high skill level, there's only a small likelihood of them succeeding.

But effective kicks are boring. What martial art teacher worth the salt in Bruce Lee's sweat wants to teach boring stuff? And what student wants to spend their hard, long training hours learning boring kicks?


Anyone who wants to be effective, that's who. So, I'm going to try to sell you on the super-secret kick that will become one of the absolute most effective moves in your arsenal.

The fact is, there is a single kick that is as effective as a kick can possibly be in nearly every situation that warrants a kick. It can go high. It can go low. It can snap, it can push, it can deliver precision and power; it can break a jaw, and it can crush a groin. This kick is so simple that nearly anyone can throw it at least somewhat well from day one. It's utilized by pros for both offense and defense, and you never need to leap or contort your stance to make it happen.

This kick will also be the fastest kick in your arsenal. It's the most non-telegraphic kick in existence, and it can easily be thrown from the lead or trailing leg.

Public Domain Clip Art Image | Karate kick silhouette | ID ... res.publicdomainfiles.com

But wait! There's more! This super-secret kick is straight-line, so it is very difficult to perceive and block. It's a great counter kick and requires very little hip rotation. Plus, it's the perfect setup kick for other kicks, if you're still set on trying those fancy ones.

I can hear you yelling, "Please! Sign me up now!" So, what is this super-secret awesome kick? Drum roll please… The front kick. Yup. That lowly kick that most students abandoned (or wished they could abandon) in their first month so they could learn the fancy stuff.

The front kick is the uncool kick that does it all. I remember many, many years ago seeing the great Joe Lewis on the cover of Black Belt Magazine. He was already a legend and could have wowed readers with any of a number of flashy kicks. But Lewis was all about being effective. More than anything, he wanted to get the job done. So, what did he select for his cover shot? You guessed it: A simple boring front kick. I think I can speak for most of us when I say that the last place we would want to be would be within range of that uncool kick. Learn it. Train it and then, train it some more. It will never let you down. Who wants to sit at the cool kid's table when you can sit at the winner's table?

Dr. Craig's Martial Arts Movie Lounge

When The Fast and the Furious (2001) sped into the psyche's of illegal street racing enthusiasts, with a penchant for danger and the psychotic insanity of arrant automotive adventure, the brusque bearish, quasi-hero rebel, Dominic "Dom" Toretto was caustic yet salvationally portrayed with the power of a train using a Vin Diesel engine.

Keep Reading Show less

Japan continued its dominance of judo at the Olympics Wednesday as Chizuru Arai added yet another gold medal to the host country's haul defeating Austria's Michaela Polleres to capture the women's 70 kg class at Tokyo's esteemed Nippon Budokan arena. After choking Madina Taimazova unconscious to win a 16 minute, overtime marathon contest in the semifinals, Arai hit a foot sweep for a half point in regulation time to beat Polleres in the finals and take the gold.

On the men's side, Georgia's Lasha Bekauri returned from a shoulder injury at last month's world championships winning the 90 kg title by scoring a half point throw on Germany's Eduard Trippel in the finals.

Keep Reading Show less

You can be as prepared as ever and still not get the results you had wanted or expected. You can put your heart into every training session, just to lose. The truth is when you step onto the mat the numerical results are out of your control. Sometimes, as mentioned, you can train harder than you ever have, hit a "near perfect" form and still lose. Ironically other times, you can run a form that you didn't think was your strongest with a few slight missteps and still win. Part of having a competitor IQ means that you can assess yourself and your performances realistically and make the proper changes, if any, (but there always are) moving forward to the next tournament. I'm going to share my evaluation process between tournaments down below:

Keep Reading Show less