Essential Gear

February/March 2020

STRIVE CARDIO KICKBOXING GLOVES
These gloves from Century Martial Arts have some brand-new looks. Washer and dryer safe, they're comfortable and durable gloves that won't slow you down with constant care and maintenance — just pop them in the wash between workouts. Plus, the bold new designs are sublimated and resistant to cracking and fading, which ensures that the colors stay as strong as your haymaker. Keeping your gloves up is easy when they look this good.
PRICES VARY
CENTURYMARTIALARTS.COM



TORRENT BAGS
The latest in the long line of Century's revolutionary free-standing bags, the Torrent T1 and T2 bag system features a two-part stem design, which allows the bag to bend, flow and shift with each strike. Keep throwing punches instead of chasing the bag!
PRICES VARY
CENTURYMARTIALARTS.COM


PADDLE TARGETS
Century's new Custom Double Paddle Targets are the perfect tool for the versatile fighter. The angled, double-sided striking surface is ideal for quick changes in attacks, allowing for varied combinations with fluid movement — each blow landing with a satisfying snap. For a personal touch, get your artwork silkscreened on any of the bold color options.
PRICES VARY
CENTURYMARTIALARTS.COM



BALANCED HYDRATION
Balanced Hydration features more bioavailable forms of the electrolytes you need with zero sugar and no artificial sweeteners, colors or flavors. It's higher in potassium than sodium so you can promote hydration during the day long before you start training.|$30
VITAMINSHOPPE.COM



CHEN STYLE TAIJIQUAN
This new book by Mark Chen is subtitled Collected Masterworks: The History of a Martial Art. The 232-pager provides a fascinating glimpse into China's martial past and the self-defense system one facet of it generated.
$19
BLUESNAKEBOOKS.COM



KI-AI HEADBANDS
These headbands are designed to help unify and focus your spirit and body every time you tie one on. Like the headbands that inspired and motivated Japan's samurai and ninja, these high-quality pieces will inspire and motivate you.
$11-$13
KI-AIENTERPRISES.COM



HAND WRAPS WITH INSTRUCTIONS
ArrowWay developed its Instructional Hand Wraps to guide newcomers along a safer path to the ring. Approximately 142 inches long, they feature step-by-step directions for wrapping your hands for maximum support.
$10
MEISTERELITE.COM


How will you perform at the moment of truth?

What's going to happen to you physically and emotionally in a real fight where you could be injured or killed? Will you defend yourself immediately, hesitate during the first few critical seconds of the fight, or will you be so paralyzed with fear that you won't be able to move at all? The answer is - you won't know until you can say, "Been there, done that." However, there is a way to train for that fearful day.

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This week I've asked Robert Borisch to give me a birds eye view on his marketing strategy.

Robert is the head sensei and owner of Tri-City Judo a well-established commercial judo school in Kennewick, Washington. I am very impressed with his highly successful business. Unlike BJJ, TKD, karate, and krav maga, in judo we tend to teach in community centers, YMCA's, and other not for profit outlets. So when I find a for profit judo model that is growing by leaps and bounds, it intrigues me. Below are Robert's raw and uncensored comments spoken like a true commercial martial arts school entrepreneur / owner.

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The man who apparently launched a racist verbal attack on U.S. women's kata champion Sakura Kokumai earlier this month in a California park has been arrested following a physical assault on an elderly Korean-American couple in the same park Sunday. Michael Vivona is accused of punching a 79-year-old man and his 80-year-old wife without provocation.

Mynewsla.com reported that a group of people playing basketball in Grijalva Park at the time of the assault recognized Vivona from his previous harassment of Kokumai and surrounded him until a nearby police officer arrived to make an arrest. The incident with Kokumai, who is slated to represent the United States in this summer's Tokyo Olympics, gained widespread notice after she posted a video of it on social media in an effort to increase awareness about the growing threat of anti-Asian racism.