An exhibition titled “KICK ASS! Kung Fu Posters From the Stephen Chin Collection” will open in Beverly Hills, California. It will showcase martial arts movie memorabilia and feature a screening of the Bruce Lee blockbuster.

On April 17, 2013, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences will open a new exhibition titled “KICK ASS! Kung Fu Posters From the Stephen Chin Collection” with a 40th-anniversary screening of Bruce Lee’s Enter the Dragon at the Samuel Goldwyn Theater in Beverly Hills, California. The evening will feature an introduction by Stephen Chin and a discussion with the film’s cast and crew, including actor John Saxon, screenwriter Michael Allin, cinematographer Gil Hubbs, and producers Fred Weintraub and Paul Heller. In 2011 producer and screenwriter Stephen Chin donated his collection of more than 800 kung fu film posters and related materials to the academy. A six-sheet poster from Enter the Dragon will be featured prominently in the exhibition, along with such collectibles as early English-language kung fu manuals, skateboards, trading cards and lunchboxes. A viewing station will feature trailers for many of the films represented in the exhibition. “The kung fu genre exploded into world cinema in the 1970s, changing forever the way action films are shot and edited [and] changing American popular culture,” Stephen Chin said. “I’m grateful that I had the opportunity to save so much of that history. And I am thrilled that the academy is now able to share it with a larger audience.” In addition to highlighting the works of Bruce Lee, the exhibition will cover the kung fu stars who followed in his footsteps, including Jackie Chan, Sonny Chiba, Sammo Hung, Jet Li and Chuck Norris. Women also will be featured, including Angela Mao and Sue Shiomi (also known as Etsuko Shihomi). Furthermore, the exhibition will look at the myriad ways in which kung fu has been blended with other genres in the West, such as blaxploitation, horror, fantasy, comedy and science fiction. Tickets for Enter the Dragon (April 17, 2013) are $5 for the general public and $3 for academy members and students with a valid ID. To purchase, go here. “KICK ASS! Kung Fu Posters From the Stephen Chin Collection” will be open to the public from April 18 through August 25 at the Academy Grand Lobby Gallery in Beverly Hills. Regular viewing hours are Tuesday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and weekends from noon to 6 p.m. Admission to the gallery is free.

SUBSCRIBE TO BLACKBELT MAGAZINE TODAY!
Don't miss a single issue of the world largest magazine of martial arts.

Do you want to maximize your self defense skills? Learn the game of combat chess and most importantly the queen of all moves.

Allow me to intercept those who would object to the title of this article. I'm not claiming that there's a secret move, shortcut or hack that will give you the edge in any fight. Even if there was an ultimate weapon or strategy, you likely would avoid it because you
Keep Reading Show less

Training in Hapkido, Watching Billy Jack and becoming a sheepdog

On the East Coast and West Coast, schools had been emerging and multiplying since the mid-1960s, but those of us who lived in "flyover country" had few opportunities to broaden our understanding of arts like karate, kung fu, judo and taekwondo.

At Union University in my hometown of Jackson, Tennessee, I'd been fortunate to train from 1969 to 1970 in the then little-known art of hapkido. In a field-house basement, a Korean student and former captain in the ROK Army known only as Mr. Suh organized and taught the system to a small group of dedicated students. Suh ran a no-nonsense traditional class, and for 10 months, we couldn't get enough of his instruction. Despite the bruises and the blood, we always looked forward to our next session.

Keep Reading Show less

Learn the mechanics and do the drills, then unleash the beast that is your round kick!

Because of its versatility and power, the round kick — known to some martial artists as the turning kick, the saber kick or the roundhouse kick — is one of the most common leg techniques in our world. No matter your particular interpretation, the basics are the same: You swing your leg along an arc until your foot or shin strikes the target.

Keep Reading Show less

How it stacks up agains 3 other go-to responses to an attack

In hand-to-hand combat, you face a constant and undeniable danger. Among other injuries, you can sustain broken bones, torn cartilage and ruptured organs. You also can be knocked unconscious or killed.Over the millennia, various cultures have developed their own techniques and strategies for dealing with such threats. One of the most pervasive is punching. That's the case because in most unarmed encounters, a properly thrown punch is the most efficient and effective tool a martial artist can use.

Keep Reading Show less
Don’t miss a thing Subscribe to Our Newsletter