Love him or hate him, Karo Parisyan has taken on some of the top names in the world of mixed martial arts. In this exclusive video, Karo Parisyan shows us three of his favorite MMA techniques and breaks them down step-by-step!

Love him or hate him, Karo Parisyan is a force to be reckoned with in the mixed martial arts. A veteran of the Ultimate Fighting Championship, King of the Cage, World Extreme Cagefighting and several other promotions, he counts Matt Serra, Nick Diaz, Chris Lytle and Shonie Carter among his vanquished foes. This expert in MMA moves was deemed worthy of facing Georges St-Pierre and Diego Sanchez — and although he lost both bouts on the scorecards, merely being granted a shot at either one would be a huge accomplishment for any fighter. In this exclusive mixed-martial arts technique video, Karo Parisyan shows us three of his favorite MMA moves: two arm-lock techniques and the triangle choke. After the jump, check out what Karo Parisyan has to say on a variety of topics!


MMA VIDEO Karo Parisyan Shows You Three of His Favorite MMA Moves: 2 Arm-Lock Techniques and a Triangle Choke!

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Karo Parisyan on Preparation for MMA Moves

"Grappling is always there, so you have to make sure you have a solid base in it. I’ve been successful because I have my judo down, but I still polish it every now and then. You also have to be ready for ground and pound. Another part of the mixed martial arts you need to focus on is hands, both for boxing and for stand-up fighting."

Karo Parisyan on Hand Skills in MMA Moves

"I train in muay Thai and boxing. They’re [used in combinations that flow from] kicks into punches. You don’t have to train specifically to go out there and do a boxing match, but you should be able to make your opponent respect your stand-up, your power and your skills. If you can’t initiate a takedown, you have to at least be comfortable when you’re standing up until you can get into the clinch."

Karo Parisyan on Chokes and Arm-Lock Techniques

"Chokes are good in MMA, but if you’re into throwing like I am, locks are great because you’ll have a 'handle' on your opponent after he hits the ground. That makes it easy to maneuver his arm into an armbar or a kimura — or downward arm crank, as Gene LeBell says."

Karo Parisyan on Finishing

"It’s fine to really push for a submission, but you have to realize that it’s easier to lose when you do. Sometimes you put so much into a technique or you hold your breath while going for the submission that you get tired. That leaves you open. Then your opponent might escape and get positioning on you."

Karo Parisyan on Training Partners

"If you’re [training MMA moves], you have to train with partners who are also MMA fighters. However, you should pay attention to what athletes in other sports do to improve their conditioning. The more you know, the better."

Karo Parisyan on Being in Top Shape

"When you’re in shape physically and can fight for five full rounds, you don’t really have to care how in shape your opponent is. Mentally, you have to put yourself in the indestructible zone. I tell myself: I’m going to do stuff to my opponent that he never even thought I would."

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Karo Parisyan on Unexpected MMA Moves

"I like to come in from different angles. Passing the guard, I’ll punch my opponent and elbow him from spots where he won’t see it coming. I’ll go for a submission halfway, then stop and throw a hard elbow to give him a cut. Or I might ground-and-pound him into a submission — by hitting him hard and inflicting some pain on his body or face, then taking advantage of an opening and going for the finish."

Karo Parisyan on Losing (or When Favorite Moves Like Arm-Lock Techniques and the Triangle Choke Don't Work)

"When you taste a loss, look at yourself in the mirror and see your cuts. Think about the depression you’re feeling, how bitter and nasty it is. Then think about how you never want to feel that way again — all that emotional pain, that self-criticism. "Then, if you have to, go back to the drawing board. Get back on the horse and start riding again. The difference between a man and boy is that men don’t give up at certain times and boys do. "My advice for the people around a fighter who just lost is this: We don’t like to be pitied. We hate it when somebody says, 'I told you that you should have done this.' Don’t say anything. Let us recover, then tell us whatever you want when we’re in a calmer state of mind."

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