As the tactical foundation of Israeli defense and security forces, kapap's face-to-face combat system continues to serve a vital role in modern self-defense. This four-DVD collection expands on content found in the Kapap Combat Concepts book, illustrating concepts in real-time with a variety of instructors and experts led by system co-creators Avi Nardia and Albert Timen and special Brazilian jiu-jitsu adviser John Machado. Topics include relative position, attacking sensory points, body conditioning for combat, third-party protection, holds and releases, gun disarms, shared principles with Philippine martial arts and Brazilian jiu-jitsu, drills for multiple-opponent attacks and much more! Volume 1: Principles and Conditioning focuses on the push-pull principle, manipulations via T-shapes, linear vs. circular attacks, countering edged-weapon attacks, relative position, sensory points, brain attacks, high-low attack principle, and combat conditioning.


Photo by Kem West
Gillian White has worked in film and television for 25 years — far longer than she's been married to Michael Jai White, whom she wed in 2015. Recently, she's created a buzz in the entertainment industry because of her role as Zara in Take Back, a movie that also stars her husband and teacher, as well as Mickey Rourke. After eight years of hybrid training that includes kyokushin karate and an array of effective fighting styles, Gillian will step into history as the first Black female martial artist to play the lead in an action film when Take Back is released this year.
Keep Reading Show less
Not many martial arts styles, methods, or forms come with a patented nutritional program to maximize a fighter's health and performance. Gracie jujitsu is not only a form of fighting; it is a lifestyle that fuses the mind, body, spirit, and nutrition to develop the best possible person and fighter.
Keep Reading Show less

I recall Floyd Burk who is also a regular writer and contributor to Black Belt Magazine once asked for my input on article he had in the works entitled 'The Aging Martial Artist'.

Specifically he wanted to know the biggest change in your martial arts ability that you've noticed over the years? (Answer could be physical, philosophical, strategic, etc..)

Because judo is so physical, many of the moves I can no longer do because of prior injuries and trying to avoid future ones, (after 60 it takes much longer to recover). So my role have gravitated towards being involved in running the judo organizations, promoting large events, refereeing, developing future leaders, as well as providing wisdom that comes with age and experience.

Keep Reading Show less