Julius Melegrito — founder of the Philippine Martial Arts Alliance and the Phillipine Combatives System — demonstrates the redonda twirling drill for two Filipino fighting sticks in this exclusive video. In the video, Julius Melegrito wields two Filipino fighting sticks at speeds approaching the appearance of helicopter rotor blades while a training partner holds his own Filipino fighting sticks as contact guides.

FILIPINO FIGHTING STICKS VIDEO Julius Melegrito Shows You the "Redonda" Training Drill for Two Filipino Fighting Sticks

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In explaining how to handle Filipino fighting sticks for this training drill, Julius Melegrito says, "You don't want to tighten your muscles. Just relax. Just let it drop." The Filipino fighting arts instructor's progressive display of speed takes the lesson from veritable slow-motion to full-speed fury as his sticks whirl in a blur. "If you get the motion, you wanna just go ahead and [have your partner] step back a little bit," the Black Belt Hall of Fame member says. "You just have the [partner's Filipino fighting sticks as a] guide, but you don't want to hit [them]." This training drill for Filipino fighting sticks increases hand-eye coordination and develops technique-execution speed with the rattan weapons.

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The above video is an excerpt from Julius Melegrito's DVD Philippine Fighting Arts — Volume 2: Double-Stick Tactics and Applications, which features a selection of Filipino fighting techniques that this dynamic self-defense expert has taught to military and law-enforcement personnel. Presenting the theory and application of Filipino fighting arts such as arnis, kali and escrima, Philippine Fighting Arts — Volume 2: Double-Stick Tactics and Applications includes topics such as proper holds, striking patterns, applied footwork, counterstrikes, disarms, partner drills, sticks vs. empty-hand techniques, single- and double-stick tactics, and knife applications. Also included on Philippine Fighting Arts — Volume 2: Double-Stick Tactics and Applications are sequences that combine Filipino fighting arts techniques with reality-based scenarios such as car-window attacks, ATM assaults and chokes from behind, making this a traditional martial arts DVD applicable to the modern world! For more techniques by Julius Melegrito, check out these great stories: Black Belt martial arts DVD instructor Julius Melegrito is the founder of the Philippine Martial Arts Alliance and the Philippine Combatives System. During his periodic travels through the United States, Austria, Switzerland, Germany, Ireland, Australia, Japan and the Philippines, he teaches his dynamic array of self-defense programs to civilian populations as well as military and law-enforcement personnel. Julius Melegrito has been recognized for his years of study and service by a variety of publications, organizations and halls of fame. Currently, Julius Melegrito operates a chain of Martial Arts International schools in Bellevue and Omaha, Nebraska.
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